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      <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/  http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"> <title>Catch-22 for women lawyers</title>
 <description>Speech for Women Lawyers Association of New South Wales 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner by The Hon Justice Mary Gaudron, High Court of Australia at NSW Parliament House, Sydney, 13 June 2002 SOME of you will remember Yossarian, the main character in Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, who, hoping to live forever or, at least, until he finished his tour of duty as a bomber pilot in the Second World War, pursued a life of boredom on the theory that, that way, time would go more slowly - perhaps so slowly that he would live for ever. It may be that, tonight, I will be able to extend your lives by the same process. However, if the reverse is true, there may be some reason to think the days of the Women Lawyers Association of New South Wales are numbered.  The past 50 years have been action-packed and interesting years both for the women lawyers of New South Wales and for the Women Lawyers Association. Those 50 years have seen women graduate from our law schools in numbers that, I suspect, the founders of the Women Lawyers Association could never have anticipated; they have seen women excel academically and become respected legal academics here and abroad; they have seen women enter legal practice in greater and greater numbers, and, perhaps, more significantly, they have seen women remain in practice thereby achieving the status and professional respect that, despite the merit theory, still accompany seniority; they have seen women elected leaders of their professional associations; they have seen them become partners and senior partners in the large law firms; they have seen them become members of the senior bar and accept appointment to every level of the New South Wales and Federal judiciary. Women lawyers have achieved a measure of success and recognition that, I suspect, was not dreamed of when the Women Lawyers Association held its first meeting at the Women’s Club on 6 March 1952.  Of the 22 women who attended the inaugural meeting, at least 12 are here present tonight. A little later, I shall say something as to how the Association came to be formed. Before doing so, however, I should give you a thumbnail sketch of the first women lawyers in New South Wales, some of whom also became active members of the Association.  The first step in the history of the women lawyers in New South Wales begins with the Senate of the University of Sydney, a body on which a former president of this Association, Daphne Kok, served with distinction for many years. In 1881, the Senate resolved to open the University to women and "to afford them all its rights and privileges in complete equality with men"  - a move ridiculed by the Bulletin as "a farce" on the basis that "a girl who has received a higher education is generally a prig or a poseur" .  Eighteen years later, during the absence overseas of the Dean, Professor Pitt Corbett, Ada Evans enrolled in the Faculty of Law. On his return, the Dean summoned Ada to his presence and, with a fine grasp of legal principle, informed her that she did not have the physique for law and would find medicine more suitable . This notwithstanding, Ada graduated in law in 1902 and, so, this year marks not only the 50th anniversary of the Women lawyers Association, but the centenary of the graduation of the first woman lawyer in New South Wales.  Although she had graduated, Ada was refused registration as a student at law on the ground that there was no precedent . Indeed, there was none. Instead, there was a line of judicial authority, testimony to the creative genius of the common law as administered by men, that women were not "persons" and could not avail themselves of rights or privileges not specifically conferred on women . There then began a political campaign, not only in New South Wales, but in the other States and in the United Kingdom for legislation that would enable women to practice law. It was a campaign which some men supported, one even asserting as late as 1920 and anonymously, that "both branches of the law appear as excellent an opening for the same type of celibate women with exceptional talent as any other profession".  He added: "The truth is that the differences between the sexes have been grossly exaggerated by priests, journalists and fools generally, and there can be no doubt that at least one percent of women are quite as intelligent as any man."   Ada’s political campaign culminated in the Women’s Legal Status Act 1918 (NSW) which enabled her to become enrolled as a student-at-law and, in 1921, to be admitted to the bar. However she never practised, taking the view that too much time had elapsed since she took her degree and that she did not wish "women’s standing in the profession to be undermined by a show of incompetence" .  Three years later, three women were admitted to practice: Marie Byles as a solicitor, Sybil Morrison as a barrister, and later, in the same year, Chris Jollie-Smith, transferred from the Victorian Roll to the Roll of Solicitors in New South Wales. Sybil Morrison practised briefly at the bar, before going to England in 1930. Marie Byles, a buddhist, a bushwalker and nature lover, and Chris Jollie-Smith, a Communist and civil libertarian, were still in practice 40 years later when, in 1964, Daphne Kok and I became student liaison officers for the Women Lawyers Association.  Gradually others came along. Nerida Cohen, a noted feminist, was admitted to the bar in 1935 and practised until 1942 when she accepted appointment to the Women’s Employment Board. Jean Malor, the first woman to graduate with first class honours in law and a foundation member of the Association, was admitted in 1937 and became senior legal adviser to the Law Book Company; Veronica Pike, roving ambassador for the Women Lawyers Association until her death in 1986, and also a foundation member of the Association, was admitted as a solicitor in 1940. And so on, as one by one, through the 1940’s, another 48 women were admitted to practice . During the 1940’s, some women lawyers met regularly in the Feminist Club in King Street. From time to time, one or other of them claimed to represent women lawyers generally or to speak on their behalf, often expressing views not fully shared by younger women practitioners bent on making a career in the law.  Thus, it was that Marie Kinsella, Peggy Crawley, Zena Sachs and Judith Selig - all of whom are here tonight - determined to form the Women Lawyers Association and set about drafting its constitution. Let me say a word about each of them. Marie Kinsella, later Marie Sexton, went to work in the Attorney-General’s Department in Canberra, there compiling the Annotated Constitution, a book which, although now out of date, never leaves my side; Peggy Crawley is still in practice and, in the 1970’s, successfully challenged the AJC’s refusal to admit women to membership with the consequence that she and Cecily Backhouse became its first two women members; Zena Sachs was research assistant to Professor Julius Stone and, as Graduate Assistant, ran the Department of Jurisprudence at Sydney University Law School for many years; Judith Selig married Senator Sam Cohen and, later, became Justice Cohen of the Australian Conciliation Commission.  It was Judith Cohen who, with the draft constitution in her briefcase, called on Nerida Goodman and invited her to be the Association’s first president. Nerida accepted and, as you know, the first meeting was held in the Women’s Club on 6 March 1952 with 22 women lawyers then forming the Association. Other foundation members who are here tonight are Pat Oldfield, Joan Spruitt, Pat Hinch, Judy Clayton, Joan O’Hara, Beck McPaul and Jean Hill.  One who was present at the meeting, as a student, was Elizabeth Evatt, the first woman to win the University Medal in Law. Elizabeth later became the first female deputy president of the Conciliation and Arbitration Commission and, later, Chief Justice of the Family Court. Elizabeth, who is also with us tonight, did not join the Association in 1952. She took the view - a view which she has long since abandoned but which persisted with many, at least until the 1970’s - that the Association was unnecessary and that women lawyers should and would take their place alongside men as their equals in the profession in the ordinary course.  The 1950’s saw more women admitted to the profession, both as barristers and solicitors. Many of them joined the Association, which saw its role as improving the lot of women and children. To this end, the Association campaigned for the rights of illegitimate children, as they were then so cruelly called, and for legislation enabling women and children to seek proper provision from the estates of their husbands and fathers. Both campaigns were to continue throughout the 1950’s and 1960’s.  The decade of the 60’s was a decade of revolution, and not just the sexual revolution. The Commonwealth Scholarship scheme made it possible for more women to study law; the contraceptive pill made it possible to pursue marriage and a career in the law. But the profession was less than welcoming. By way of example, in the 1960’s, the Chief Justice’s admission day speech, which concentrated heavily on pregnant black clouds on our northern border - a metaphorical reference which might then have been apt had the Chief Justice realised that our northern border was the Tweed and not the South China sea, was varied whenever a woman was admitted to the bar to include the observation that a woman barrister was mother nature’s only mistake. Presumably the pregnant black clouds were part of her grand design!  With the growing influence of feminism in the 1970’s and the enactment of anti-discrimination legislation, blatant rudeness and discrimination went underground in the profession, save in the case of the wilfully unreconstructed who, I should think, included Roderick Pitt Meagher. I mention him because, only recently he was reported as saying: "The bar desperately needs more women barristers [because] there are so many bad ones that people may say that women ... are hopeless by nature" .  It is and always has been relatively simple to dismiss such remarks as the mutterings of male malcontents who, for very good reason, fear dealing with women on equal terms. However, the natural and probable consequence of a remark of that kind, when made by one of the most senior judges of this state’s Court of Appeal, is that few, if any, women barristers will be briefed to appear in that Court. We should not insult Justice Meagher’s intelligence by pretending that he did not and does intend that very consequence. Indeed, it is fundamental to the law that a person is presumed to intend the natural and probable consequences of his or her acts.  I do not propose to go through developments in the decades following the 1970’s except to note that, from the late 1970’s, women have numbered more than 30% of all law graduates and, for at least five years, they have numbered more than half. Which brings me back to where I started - 50 action-packed years for women lawyers and the Women Lawyers Association, but with what result?  Let me quote the headline of Kate Marshall’s article in the Financial Review of 31 May this year: "Highest courts still lack women" . The highlighted "key points" for those too busy to read the article in its entirety: "Women are still severely under-represented in Australia’s judiciary. Only magistrates’ courts and the Family Court are making headway" .  In that article, Chief Justice Michael Black is quoted, I think quite accurately, as saying "there are far too few women judges, but ... the problem [is] the lack of numbers at more senior levels of the profession."  Indeed, the numbers are depressing. In New South Wales seven women are members of the senior bar, out of a total of 308. Australia-wide, there are approximately 30 out of 700. The standard explanation for these dismal statistics is one that is as insidious and counter-productive as Justice Roddy Meagher’s ingenuous argument in support of more women going to the bar. The standard explanation, which I have been hearing for more than 20 years, is that women of merit will inevitably be granted silk and its only a matter of time until they are.  That explanation is dishonest. And it is calculated to ensure that the number of women taking silk remains pathetically low. It is dishonest because it slyly conveys the message that men of silk are men of merit - a proposition which, if true, would mean that there were many, many fewer than 300 men with silk in New South Wales, and many, many fewer than 700 Australia-wide. It is doubly dishonest because it is predominantly those men who have benefited from not having to compete with women on equal terms who decide what constitutes merit, a task at which they have often enough demonstrated something short of complete competence. And the explanation is calculated to ensure that the number of women who take silk remains low because it conveys the message that those who have sufficient years of practice do not have the necessary ability, thereby ensuring that they are not given the briefs which would indicate their ability to carry silk. So catch-22 - back where we started.  The merit fiction is by no means the sole deterrent to women’s success at the bar. Perhaps the most significant barrier is patronage. Patronage still governs who gets the chambers and where; it still governs the passing of briefs, the selection of juniors and, to the extent briefing patterns result from recommendations, briefing itself.  On another occasion , I explained to the New South Wales Bar what is wrong with patronage. I will do it again. Patronage is about creating people in one’s own image, about perpetuating the status quo, securing conformity, protecting the prevailing ethos and stifling originality of thought. Patronage means that merit is not the sole criterion for success; it explains why, for some, mere incompetence is no handicap and, for others, outstanding ability is no guarantee against failure. Patronage is, thus, inequality; patronage is discrimination and, ultimately, patronage is contrary to the interests of justice. And if it works for women, it works only for those who are prepared to be moulded by their makers.  I know there are individual men of good will at the bar who wish to advance the interests of women barristers. Sadly, I do not believe they can or, at least, not within the existing organisational structures. Perhaps, the picture is rosier for women solicitors.  At least numerically, women solicitors fare somewhat better than their sisters at the bar. Let me read you some statistics compiled by my Associate from the current Law Almanac as to the number of partners, consultants and/or special counsel in Sydney’s large law firms who are women:  Mallesons: 16 out of 91 - 17.6%  Freehills: 22 out of 101 - 21.8%  Allens: 14 out of 92 - 15%  Blakes: 17 out of 82 - 20.7%  Clayton Utz: 21 out of 75 - 28%  Deacons: 9 out of 74 - 12.2%  Gilbert and Tobin: 8 out of 39 - 20.5%  Minter Ellison: 7 out of 74 - 9.5%  Phillips Fox: 12 out of 47 - 25.5%  Pricewaterhouse Coopers Legal: 11 out of 33 - 33%  However, let me read you something from the Australian Financial Review of last Tuesday, 11 June 2002, headed "Female lawyers out of practice" . The article begins:  "Despite years of women dominating legal courses and the rank and file of law firms, a landmark report has revealed that inflexible work practices at partnership level continue to force women out of the profession at the height of their career."  The article concludes:  "the legal profession [is] inflexible and insensitive to the private lives of solicitors, ... the careers of men and women ‘dramatically diverge[]’ within five years of graduation and ... the expectation that women will have children ‘profoundly affects’ their career prospects."  Let me turn to the hours young women solicitors are required to work in the large law firms. I have heard them described by a very senior male partner in one of our largest law firms as "inhuman". If not inhuman, they are exploitative and indicative of incompetent practice management. The nature and probable consequence of the hours which young women solicitors are required or pressured into working is that they will leave the profession because of exhaustion, burn-out and the inability to combine work with any sort of social or family life. Given the presumption that persons intend the natural and probable consequences of their acts, one is driven to conclude that large firms are deliberately adopting work practices to ensure that a goodly number of women are driven from practice.  Nothing that I have said would matter a fig were it not for the fact that the profession needs and the interests of justice demand the greater involvement of women in the law. The law is indispensable to a well-ordered society and, indeed, to the commercial and economic life of the nation. The wellbeing of those individuals who together constitute our society and the security of the nation’s commercial and economic life both depend on just legal outcomes. In times of rapid social and economic change, such as we have seen in the past decades, just legal outcomes depend on the law being kept in good and serviceable order. That in turn requires lawyers to understand the nature and extent of the commercial and human issues that are being driven by change, to articulate the nature of the issues which have thus emerged and to effectively advocate the interests of those they represent.  Regrettably, I do not think that the still male-dominated legal profession has performed these functions well in the recent past. Had they done so, I am sure that, today, we would not be having the debate we are about the "insurance crisis" and the need for tort law reform. Ideally, the relevant laws - and not just the law of tort - would have evolved so that the debate would never have been necessary. But even if the law had evolved to that point, I think the debate would be about very different issues, including the enforcement of health and safety laws, the desirability of a national insurance scheme and the regulation of the insurance and re-insurance industries.  Equally, I believe that had the legal profession been effective servants of justice, the rights of individuals would have been much better protected. Tonight is not the occasion to give chapter and verse of the profession’s failings in this regard. It is sufficient to note that, as I read the banner headlines confirming "the Mickelberg Stitch" earlier this week, I was reminded of the corrupt practices of police officers revealed in New South Wales not so very long ago. Those practices by which the police fabricated evidence to improve a prosecution case jeopardised the most basic of our rights - the right to a fair trial. Those practices could flourish only because our judges and lawyers, again mostly male, were not equal to the task of preventing them.  Whatever else may be said, it seems to me that the failures of the law and legal profession cannot be blamed on women. By a process of elimination and with only a slight leap of faith and logic, I am driven to the conclusion that women lawyers are the law’s only real hope for the future.  There is a more worrying conclusion to which I am driven. It is this: women simply cannot rely either on their legal talent or on the goodwill of enlightened men in the profession - and there are some - to achieve the measure of success that they deserve and that the interests of justice demand. If we are to achieve the measure of success we deserve and make our own distinctive contribution to the law and justice, we must do it by ourselves. We must assert our difference. We must reject patronage and professional structures and create new ones. And I believe we can.  Modern technologies already render much of the way in which the profession is organised outmoded, inefficient and ridiculously expensive. At the very least modern technology exposes the requirement that young solicitors spend long hours in the office as a cruel hoax and suggest a myriad of ways to limit the cost of going to the bar and, ultimately the cost of justice.  Change is inevitable. We must make it work for us and in the interests of justice. We should seize the opportunities which now present themselves. We must refuse to be exploited, demeaned and humiliated. We need only dare to be different and have confidence in ourselves.  Would you please join me in a toast to the future of women lawyers, the future of the Women Lawyers Association and the foundation members with us tonight, without whom we might never have had a future at all. •</description>
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reserved.</rights><metadataSource>GALE</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2016-03-01</issued><holdingsCount>0</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="223380054" url="/work/223380054"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/223380054</troveUrl><title>Alive in the telling': Trailblazing women lawyers' lives, lived with law</title><contributor>Rubenstein, Kim</contributor><issued>2016-2017</issued><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><type>Article</type><isPartOf url="/work/16855253">Law Text Culture</isPartOf><holdingsCount>0</holdingsCount><versionCount>2</versionCount><relevance score="1.3363799">very relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="restricted">https://search.informit.com.au/fullText;dn=664990555459496;res=IELHSS</identifier><version id="244960936"><record><identifier type="rmitDocumentNumber">664990555459496</identifier><title>Alive in the telling': Trailblazing women lawyers' lives, lived with law</title><creator>Rubenstein, Kim</creator><description type="byline">Professor of Law, ANU College of Law, Australian National University</description><isPartOf type="publication">Law Text Culture</isPartOf><bibliographicCitation type="volume">20</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="pagination">66-92</bibliographicCitation><issued type="dcterms:W3CDTF">2017</issued><bibliographicCitation type="yearIssued">2017</bibliographicCitation><type>Journal Article</type><subject>Australian National University</subject><subject>Women--Conduct of life</subject><subject>Women lawyers</subject><subject>Alive in the Writing: Crafting Ethnography in the Company of Chekhov (book)</subject><abstract>The title of this chapter is inspired by Kirin Narayan's book - 'Alive in the Writing: Crafting Ethnography in the Company of Chekhov' (2012), who I heard speak at the Australian National University where she was later appointed Professor in the School of Culture, History and Language. Kirin engaged us all in her life journey as an anthropologist with verve, passion and energy. Her message was that 'when words gather together with energy, others places, other people, and other voices stir in parallel life' (2012: ix). She reminds us that writing can be as powerful as her oral presentation in conveying her drive and spirit and she provides great insights on how we can all seek to be 'alive in the writing'.</abstract><language>English</language><spatial>England</spatial><bibliographicCitation type="issn">1322-9060</bibliographicCitation><date type="metadata">20171102114742</date><identifier linktype="restricted">https://search.informit.com.au/fullText;dn=664990555459496;res=IELHSS</identifier><isPartOf type="rmitProduct">IELAPA</isPartOf><isPartOf type="rmitProduct">IELHSS</isPartOf><description peerReviewed="y">Peer reviewed</description><metadataSource>Informit</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2017</issued><holdingsCount>0</holdingsCount></version><version id="245237720"><record><identifier type="galeAccessionNumber">490566083</identifier><bibliographicCitation type="yearIssued">2016</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="dateIssued">Annual</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="volume">20</bibliographicCitation><issued type="dcterms:W3CDTF">2016-01-01</issued><title>'Alive in the telling': trailblazing women
lawyers' lives, lived with law.(Australia)(Lives Lived with
Law)</title><language>English</language><alternative>'Alive in the telling': trailblazing women
lawyers' lives, lived with law.</alternative><creator>Rubenstein, Kim</creator><bibliographicCitation type="pagination">66-92</bibliographicCitation><subject>Women attorneys -- Research</subject><subject>Women attorneys -- Influence</subject><subject>Women attorneys -- History</subject><subject>Oral history -- Usage</subject><subject>Oral history -- Methods</subject><subject>Oral history -- Social aspects</subject><subject>Women lawyers -- Research</subject><subject>Women lawyers -- Influence</subject><subject>Women lawyers -- History</subject><subject>Oral history -- Usage</subject><subject>Oral history -- Methods</subject><subject>Oral history -- Social aspects</subject><subject code="310" type="eventCode">Science & research</subject><subject code="290" type="eventCode">Public affairs</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Research</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Influence</subject><subject type="topicalScope">History</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Usage</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Methods</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Social aspects</subject><spatial type="jurisdiction">Australia</spatial><isPartOf code="GALE0CVT" type="publication">Law-Text-Culture</isPartOf><publisher>University of Wollongong</publisher><audience>Professional</audience><medium type="publication">Magazine/Journal article</medium><subject>Anthropology/archeology/folklore</subject><subject>Law</subject><subject>Literature/writing</subject><bibliographicCitation type="issn">1322-9060</bibliographicCitation><rights type="metadata">Copyright 2016 Gale, Cengage Learning.  All rights
reserved.</rights><metadataSource>GALE</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2016-01-01</issued><holdingsCount>0</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191627360" url="/work/191627360"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191627360</troveUrl><title>Glaciology and geological signature of the last glacial maximum antarctic ice sheet</title><contributor>Golledge, Nicholas</contributor><contributor> Levy, Richard</contributor><contributor> McKay, Robert</contributor><contributor> Fogwill, Christopher</contributor><contributor> White, Duanne</contributor><contributor> Graham, Alastair</contributor><contributor> Licht, Kathy</contributor><contributor> Denton, George</contributor><contributor> Ackert, Robert</contributor><contributor> Maas, Sanne</contributor><contributor> Hall, Brenda</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.12222943">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/54d74b2f-af0e-4da7-941c-ee7c696e519f/1/</identifier><version id="209269272"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:54d74b2f-af0e-4da7-941c-ee7c696e519f/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-10-02T02:10:56Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/54d74b2f-af0e-4da7-941c-ee7c696e519f/1/</identifier><type>Journal journal article</type><creator>Golledge, Nicholas </creator><creator>Levy, Richard</creator><creator>McKay, Robert</creator><creator>Fogwill, Christopher </creator><creator>White, Duanne</creator><creator>Graham, Alastair </creator><creator>Licht, Kathy </creator><creator>Denton, George</creator><creator>Ackert, Robert </creator><creator>Maas, Sanne</creator><creator>Hall, Brenda </creator><title>Glaciology and geological signature of the last glacial maximum antarctic ice sheet</title><description /><subject>ice-sheet modelling; glacial geolog; subglacial erosion; plio-pleistocene</subject><date>2013</date><rights>©2013 Elsevier</rights><relation>Quaternary Science Reviews</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FL100100195</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT120100004
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communications; lotka-volterra; population dynamics; resource allocation; smart grid</subject><date>2014</date><rights>©2014 IEEE</rights><relation>2014 IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference (WCNC)</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096276</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Conference paper</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="193269608" url="/work/193269608"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/193269608</troveUrl><title>Optimal resource allocation for smart grid applications in high traffic wireless networks</title><contributor>Webster, Robert</contributor><contributor> Munasinghe, Kumudu</contributor><contributor> Jamalipour, Abbas</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Article/Conference paper</type><type>Article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/f87aa338-1268-4f41-80cb-f969ceb65c76/1/</identifier><version id="211602493"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:f87aa338-1268-4f41-80cb-f969ceb65c76/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-04-28T02:06:49Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/f87aa338-1268-4f41-80cb-f969ceb65c76/1/</identifier><type>Conference Publication</type><creator>Webster, Robert</creator><creator>Munasinghe, Kumudu</creator><creator>Jamalipour, Abbas</creator><title>Optimal resource allocation for smart grid applications in high traffic wireless networks</title><description /><subject>smart-grid; communications</subject><date>2014</date><rights>©2014 IEEE</rights><relation>2014 IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (DmartGridComm)</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096276 </relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Conference paper</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191627285" url="/work/191627285"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191627285</troveUrl><title>A novel scheduling technique for Smart Grid data on LTE networks</title><contributor>Karupongsiri, Chalakorn</contributor><contributor> Hossain, Farhad</contributor><contributor> Munasinghe, Kumudu</contributor><contributor> Jamalipour, Abbas</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Article/Conference paper</type><type>Article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/f3d26ee4-c660-42c4-a46a-2118995ae7ec/1/</identifier><version id="209269180"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:f3d26ee4-c660-42c4-a46a-2118995ae7ec/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-08-10T00:00:48Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/f3d26ee4-c660-42c4-a46a-2118995ae7ec/1/</identifier><type>Conference Publication</type><creator>Karupongsiri, Chalakorn</creator><creator>Hossain, Farhad</creator><creator>Munasinghe, Kumudu</creator><creator>Jamalipour, Abbas</creator><title>A novel scheduling technique for Smart Grid data on LTE networks</title><description /><subject>LTE; QoS; smart grid; smart meter</subject><date>2013</date><rights>©2013 IEEE</rights><relation>2013 7th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems (ICSPCS)</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096276</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Conference paper</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191627286" url="/work/191627286"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191627286</troveUrl><title>Ecologically inspired load balancing for LTE SON</title><contributor>Munasinghe, Kumudu</contributor><contributor> Jamalipour, Abbas</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Article/Conference paper</type><type>Article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/20d596ad-61c1-4eae-968d-39828cfd92b6/1/</identifier><version id="209269181"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:20d596ad-61c1-4eae-968d-39828cfd92b6/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-08-18T01:24:17Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/20d596ad-61c1-4eae-968d-39828cfd92b6/1/</identifier><type>conference paper</type><creator>Munasinghe, Kumudu</creator><creator>Jamalipour, Abbas</creator><title>Ecologically inspired load balancing for LTE SON</title><description /><subject>LTE; SON; resource management</subject><date>2013</date><rights>©2013 IEEE</rights><relation>2013 IEEE 77th Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC Spring)</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096276</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Conference paper</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="198225079" url="/work/198225079"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/198225079</troveUrl><title>High resolution melting (HRM) of forensically informative SNPs</title><contributor>Mehta, Bhavik</contributor><contributor> Daniel, Runa</contributor><contributor> McNevin, Dennis</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/2bfad8c1-c8e7-4a6b-90d2-2b26fcb2ab20/1/</identifier><version id="217029177"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:2bfad8c1-c8e7-4a6b-90d2-2b26fcb2ab20/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-10-14T04:16:30Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/2bfad8c1-c8e7-4a6b-90d2-2b26fcb2ab20/1/</identifier><type>Journal journal article</type><creator>Mehta, Bhavik</creator><creator>Daniel, Runa</creator><creator>McNevin, Dennis</creator><title>High resolution melting (HRM) of forensically informative SNPs</title><description /><subject>high resolution melt; 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field theory; string theory</subject><date>2013</date><rights>©2013 Elsevier </rights><relation>Nuclear Physics B</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP120101340</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="198225084" url="/work/198225084"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/198225084</troveUrl><title>Depoliticisation, governance and political participation</title><contributor>Fawcett, Paul</contributor><contributor> Marsh, David</contributor><issued>2015</issued><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/3942c0c5-0e05-41fa-bf6a-953e955a4026/1/</identifier><version id="217029182"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:3942c0c5-0e05-41fa-bf6a-953e955a4026/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-10-27T03:22:55Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/3942c0c5-0e05-41fa-bf6a-953e955a4026/1/</identifier><type>Journal journal article</type><creator>Fawcett, Paul</creator><creator>Marsh, David</creator><title>Depoliticisation, governance and political participation</title><description /><subject>depoliticisation; repoliticisation; governance; political participation</subject><date>2015</date><rights>©2014 Policy Press</rights><relation>Policy and Politics</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP120104155</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="201620324" url="/work/201620324"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/201620324</troveUrl><title>Testing single-sample estimators of effective population size in genetically structured populations</title><contributor>Holleley, Clare</contributor><contributor> Nichols, Richard</contributor><contributor> Whitehead, Michael</contributor><contributor> Adamack, Aaron</contributor><contributor> Gunn, Melissa</contributor><contributor> Sherwin, William</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.10371511">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/a38a83a2-bc68-48a6-9e67-3ab01b7d534a/1/</identifier><version id="221373250"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:a38a83a2-bc68-48a6-9e67-3ab01b7d534a/1</identifier><datestamp>2015-12-15T04:42:54Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/a38a83a2-bc68-48a6-9e67-3ab01b7d534a/1/</identifier><type>Journal journal article</type><creator>Holleley, Clare</creator><creator>Nichols, Richard </creator><creator>Whitehead, Michael</creator><creator>Adamack, Aaron</creator><creator>Gunn, Melissa </creator><creator>Sherwin, William </creator><title>Testing single-sample estimators of effective population size in genetically structured populations</title><description /><subject>effective population size; population structure; Ne; ONeSAMP; LDNE</subject><date>2014</date><rights>©2013 Springer Science+Business Media</rights><relation>Conservation Genetics</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0559363</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191187505" url="/work/191187505"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191187505</troveUrl><title>Highly differentiated ZW sex microchromosomes in the Australian Varanus species evolved through rapid amplification of repetitive sequences</title><contributor>Kazumi Matsubara</contributor><contributor> Sarre, Stephen</contributor><contributor> Georges, Arthur</contributor><contributor> Matsuda, Yoichi</contributor><contributor> Marshall Graves, Jennifer</contributor><contributor> Ezaz, Tariq</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.09778354">limited relevance</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/dcb0f3a2-41d2-4180-879b-4243ed12c081/1/</identifier><version id="208551958"><record><header><identifier>oai:www.canberra.edu.au:dcb0f3a2-41d2-4180-879b-4243ed12c081/1</identifier><datestamp>2014-06-10T05:16:23Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/            http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier linktype="fulltext">http://www.canberra.edu.au/researchrepository/items/dcb0f3a2-41d2-4180-879b-4243ed12c081/1/</identifier><type>Journal journal article</type><creator>Kazumi Matsubara </creator><creator>Sarre, Stephen </creator><creator>Georges, Arthur </creator><creator>Matsuda, Yoichi </creator><creator>Marshall Graves, Jennifer  </creator><creator>Ezaz, Tariq </creator><title>Highly differentiated ZW sex microchromosomes in the Australian Varanus species evolved through rapid amplification of repetitive sequences </title><description /><subject>genome evolution; karyotypes; lizards; molecular evolution; sex chromosones; W chromosomes; probe hybridization; sequence motif analysis</subject><date>2014</date><rights>©2014 Matsubara et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.</rights><relation>PLoS One </relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110102262</relation><relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100733</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">AUC:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work></records></zone><zone name="map"><records s="0" n="5" total="5"><work id="209957965" url="/work/209957965"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/209957965</troveUrl><title>Looking forward-looking back : changing social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in rural NSW, 1965-2015 / Richard Howitt, Claire Colyer, Janice Monk, David Crew and Stephanie Hull ; photographs: Janice Monk, Claire Colyer, David Crew ; aerial photographs: NSW Land and Property Information</title><contributor>Howitt, Richard</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><type>Map</type><type>Article</type><type>Article/Report</type><holdingsCount>10</holdingsCount><versionCount>3</versionCount><relevance score="0.019150801">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> in the project and the Monk Archive. Title from cover. Supported by a <b>grant</b> from the Australian <b>Research</b> Council. </snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1251209</identifier><version id="244905419"><record><header>
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      </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NMQU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Report</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="230463222"><record><title>Looking forward-looking back : changing social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in rural NSW, 1965-2015 / Richard Howitt, Claire Colyer, Janice Monk, David Crew and Stephanie Hull ; photographs: Janice Monk, Claire Colyer, David Crew ; aerial photographs: NSW Land and Property Information.</title><creator type="(author.)">Howitt, Richard,</creator><creator type="(author,) (photographer.)">Colyer, Claire,</creator><creator type="(author,) (photographer.)">Monk, Janice J.,</creator><creator type="(author,) (photographer.)">Crew, David,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Hull, Stephanie,</creator><creator type="(photographer.)">Land and Property Management Authority (N.S.W.)</creator><creator type="(sponsoring body.)">Australian Research Council</creator><creator type="(issuing body.)">Macquarie University. Department of Geography and Planning</creator><issued>2016</issued><identifier type="isbn">9781741384406</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000057837804</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">953229738</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><type>Map</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>9</holdingsCount></version><version id="231318953"><record><title>Looking Forward - Looking Back : Changing social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in rural NSW, 1965-2015.</title><creator type="(Author.)">Howitt, Richard,</creator><creator type="(Author.)">Colyer, Claire,</creator><creator type="(Author.)">Monk, Janice,</creator><creator type="(Author.)">Crew, David,</creator><creator type="(Author.)">Hull, Stephanie,</creator><issued>2016</issued><publisher>South Yarra : Macmillan Education Australia.</publisher><identifier type="isbn">9781741384406</identifier><identifier type="isbn">1741384400 (Trade Paper) :</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000057953294</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>0</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="180798859" url="/work/180798859"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/180798859</troveUrl><title>Internet on the outstation</title><contributor>Rennie, Ellie</contributor><issued>2011-2016</issued><type>Book</type><type>Article/Other article</type><type>Map</type><type>Article</type><holdingsCount>2</holdingsCount><versionCount>3</versionCount><relevance score="0.017915081">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> the disadvantages associated with remote living? Internet on the Outstation is the result of a multi-year <b>research</b></snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://hdl.handle.net/1959.3/191002</identifier><version id="248031244"><record><header><identifier>hdl.handle.net/1959.3/422455</identifier><datestamp>2016-12-06T00:11:59Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/               http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>Internet on the outstation: The digital divide and remote Aboriginal communities</title>
<creator>Rennie, Ellie</creator>
<creator>Hogan, Eleanor</creator>
<creator>Gregory, Robin</creator>
<creator>Crouch, Andrew</creator>
<creator>Wright, Alyson</creator>
<creator>Thomas, Julian</creator>
<location>https://researchbank.swinburne.edu.au/items/c7d25c00-5e67-4170-8e02-479186d16089/1/</location>
<description>Internet on the Outstation provides a new take on the digital divide. Why do whole communities choose to go without the internet when the infrastructure for access is in place? Through an in-depth exploration of the digital practices occurring in Aboriginal households in remote central Australia, the authors address both the dynamics of internet adoption and the benefits that flow from its use. The book challenges us to think beyond the standard explanations for the digital divide, arguing that digital exclusion is not just another symptom of social exclusion. At its heart, Internet on the Outstation is a compelling examination of equality and difference in the digital age, asking: Can internet access help resolve the disadvantages associated with remote living? Internet on the Outstation is the result of a multi-year research collaboration, which included a trial of internet infrastructure, training and maintenance in three small Aboriginal communities (known as outstations). During the research phase, Ellie Rennie, Eleanor Hogan and Julian Thomas were based at the Swinburne Institute for Social Research in Melbourne. Robin Gregory and Andrew Crouch worked at the Centre for Appropriate Technology, an Indigenous-owned research and training organization in Alice Springs. Alyson Wright worked for the Central Land Council, the representative body for traditional owners of the central Australia region.</description>
<publisher>Institute of Network Cultures</publisher>
<date>2016</date>
<type>book</type>
<identifier linktype="fulltext">http://hdl.handle.net/1959.3/422455</identifier>
<relation>http://networkcultures.org/publications/#tods</relation>
<source>Series: Theory on Demand, no. 19</source>
<rights>Copyright © 2016. This publication is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)</rights>

<free_to_read>PDF (Published version).pdf</free_to_read>
<contributor>Swinburne University of Technology</contributor>
<oldid>swin:49245</oldid>
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<title>Internet on the outstation</title>
<creator>Rennie, Ellie</creator>
<location>https://researchbank.swinburne.edu.au/items/930483e1-13c7-4d21-ab0a-c455a7bf0d47/1/</location>
<description>Broadband will soon reach small communities in remote Australia, writes Ellie Rennie. But a few details need to be sorted out first…</description>
<publisher>Swinburne University of Technology</publisher>
<date>2011</date>
<type>other</type>
<identifier linktype="fulltext">http://hdl.handle.net/1959.3/191002</identifier>
<relation>http://inside.org.au/internet-on-the-outstation/</relation>
<source>Inside Story, 9 May 2011</source>
<rights>Copyright © 2011 Inside Story and contributor. The published version is reproduced with the permission of the publisher.</rights>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110200440</relation>

<free_to_read>2011-rennie-internet_on_the_outstation.pdf</free_to_read>
<contributor>Swinburne University of Technology</contributor>
<oldid>swin:21424</oldid>
</dc>https://researchbank.swinburne.edu.au/</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">VSWT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Other article</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="256598271"><record><title>Internet on the outstation.</title><creator>Rennie, Ellie.</creator><issued>2011</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">1044731482</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000063615327</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Map</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="190085193" url="/work/190085193"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/190085193</troveUrl><title>Sustainable urban water environment : climate, pollution and adaptation / Ashantha Goonetilleke, Tan Yigitcanlar, Godwin A. Ayoko, Prasanna Egodawatta</title><contributor>Goonetilleke, Ashantha</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><type>Map</type><holdingsCount>10</holdingsCount><versionCount>4</versionCount><relevance score="0.017915081">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet>, practitioners and <b>researchers</b> in environmental science, environmental policy and urban transport planning</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="restricted" linktext="EBSCOhost">http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=719586</identifier><version id="206963457"><record><header>
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        <title>Sustainable Urban Water Environment : Climate, Pollution and Adaptation</title>
        <creator>Goonetilleke, Ashantha</creator>
        <creator>Yigitcanlar, Tan</creator>
        <creator>Egodawatta, Prasanna</creator>
        <creator>Ayoko, Godwin A.</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>"This multi-disciplinary book provides practical solutions for safeguarding the sustainability of the urban water environment.

Firstly, the importance of the urban water environment is highlighted and the major problems urban water bodies face and strategies to safeguard the water environment are explored. Secondly, the diversity of pollutants entering the water environment through stormwater runoff are discussed and modelling approaches for factoring in climate change and future urban and transport scenarios are proposed. Thirdly, by linking the concepts of sustainable urban ecosystems and sustainable urban and transport development, capabilities of two urban sustainability assessment models are demonstrated."--publisher website</description>
        <publisher>Edward Elgar Publishing</publisher>
        <date>2014-04</date>
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        <relation>   Goonetilleke, Ashantha, Yigitcanlar, Tan, Egodawatta, Prasanna,  & Ayoko, Godwin A.   (2014)      Sustainable Urban Water Environment : Climate, Pollution and Adaptation.       Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham.         </relation>
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        <source>Science & Engineering Faculty</source><subject>Water Quality Engineering (090508)</subject><subject>Transport Planning (120506)</subject><subject>Water sensitive urban design</subject><subject>Climate change</subject><subject>Transport planning</subject><subject>Sustainable urban development</subject><subject>Sustainability</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2014-04</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="207002668"><record><title>Sustainable urban water environment : climate, pollution and adaptation / Ashantha Goonetilleke, Tan Yigitcanlar, Godwin A. Ayoko, Prasanna Egodawatta.</title><creator type="(author.)">Goonetilleke, Ashantha,</creator><creator>Goonetilleke, Ashantha.</creator><creator>Edward Elgar Publishing.</creator><issued>2014</issued><publisher>Cheltenham, U.K. : Edward Elgar Pub. Ltd.,</publisher><identifier type="isbn">1781004633 (hardback)</identifier><identifier type="isbn">9781781004630 (hardback)</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">880616648</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052752051</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><type>Map</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>8</holdingsCount></version><version id="251020123"><record><title>Sustainable urban water environment : climate, pollution and adaptation / Ashantha Goonetilleke, Tan Yigitcanlar, Godwin A. Ayoko and Prasanna Egodawatta.</title><creator type="(author.)">Goonetilleke, Ashantha,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Yigitcanlar, Tan,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Ayoko, G. A. (Godwin A.),</creator><creator type="(author.)">Egodawatta, Prasanna,</creator><creator>Ebooks Corporation</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="isbn">9781781004647 (electronic bk.)</identifier><identifier type="isbn">1781004641 (electronic bk.)</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000060907898</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="218342700"><record><title>Sustainable urban water environment : climate, pollution and adaptation / Ashantha Goonetilleke, Tan Yigitcanlar, Godwin A. Ayoko and Prasanna Egodawatta.</title><creator type="(author.)">Goonetilleke, Ashantha,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Yigitcanlar, Tan,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Ayoko, G. A. (Godwin A.),</creator><creator type="(author.)">Egodawatta, Prasanna,</creator><creator>ProQuest (Firm)</creator><issued>2014</issued><publisher>Cheltenham : Edward Elgar Publishing,</publisher><identifier type="isbn">1781004641</identifier><identifier type="isbn">9781781004647</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">875440126</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052922609</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="196158792" url="/work/196158792"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/196158792</troveUrl><title>Imagined landscapes : geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives / Jane Stadler, Peta Mitchell & Stephen Carleton</title><contributor>Stadler, Jane</contributor><issued>2015-2016</issued><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><type>Map</type><holdingsCount>15</holdingsCount><versionCount>6</versionCount><relevance score="0.017915081">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="restricted" linktext="Project MUSE">https://muse.jhu.edu/books/9780253018496</identifier><version id="216689714"><record><header>
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        <title>Imagined landscapes: geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives</title>
        <creator>Stadler, Jane</creator>
        <creator>Mitchell, Peta</creator>
        <creator>Carleton, Stephen</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>Imagined Landscapes teams geocritical analysis with digital visualization techniques to map and interrogate films, novels, and plays in which space and place figure prominently. Drawing upon A Cultural Atlas of Australia, a database-driven interactive digital map that can be used to identify patterns of representation in Australia’s cultural landscape, the book presents an integrated perspective on the translation of space across narrative forms and pioneers new ways of seeing and understanding landscape. It offers fresh insights on cultural topography and spatial history by examining the technical and conceptual challenges of georeferencing fictional and fictionalized places in narratives. Among the items discussed are Wake in Fright, a novel by Kenneth Cook, adapted iconically to the screen and recently onto the stage; the Australian North as a mythic space; spatial and temporal narrative shifts in retellings of the story of Alexander Pearce, a convict who gained notoriety for resorting to cannibalism after escaping from a remote Tasmanian penal colony; travel narratives and road movies set in Western Australia; and the challenges and spatial politics of mapping spaces for which there are no coordinates.</description>
        <publisher>Indiana University Press</publisher>
        <date>2016-02</date>
        <type>book</type>
        <relation>http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?cPath=1037_3130_5879&products_id=807772</relation>
        <relation>   Stadler, Jane, Mitchell, Peta,  & Carleton, Stephen   (2016)      Imagined landscapes: geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives.      Spatial Humanities.   Indiana University Press, Indiana, United States of America.         </relation>
        <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110100309</relation>
        <identifier>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/88018/</identifier>
        <rights>© 2016 by Jane Stadler, Peta Mitchell, and Stephen Carleton
All rights reserved.</rights>
        <rights>No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses’ Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition.</rights>
        <source>Digital Media Research Centre; Creative Industries Faculty</source><subject>FILM TELEVISION AND DIGITAL MEDIA (190200)</subject><subject>Drama Theatre and Performance Studies (190404)</subject><subject>Screen and Media Culture (200212)</subject><subject>Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Literature (200501)</subject><subject>Australian Literature (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Literature) (200502)</subject><subject>digital atlas</subject><subject>geovisualisation</subject><subject>cultural mapping</subject><subject>Australian literature</subject><subject>Australian film</subject><subject>Australian theatre</subject><subject>spatial theory</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2016-02</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="223903083"><record><title>Imagined landscapes : geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives / Jane Stadler, Peta Mitchell & Stephen Carleton.</title><creator type="(author.)">Stadler, Jane,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Mitchell, Peta,</creator><creator type="(author.)">Carleton, Stephen, 1968-,</creator><creator>EBSCOhost</creator><issued>2016</issued><identifier type="isbn">9780253018496 (e-book)</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">936462730</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000057097843</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>6</holdingsCount></version><version id="252963514"><record><header><identifier>hdl.handle.net/1959.3/442254</identifier><datestamp>2018-02-23T05:32:02Z</datestamp></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/               http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>Imagined landscapes: geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives</title>
<creator>Stadler, Jane</creator>
<creator>Mitchell, Peta</creator>
<creator>Carleton, Stephen</creator>
<location>https://researchbank.swinburne.edu.au/items/821b998b-7d89-4027-851a-b7f3e31553e7/1/</location>
<description>Imagined Landscapes teams geocritical analysis with digital visualization techniques to map and interrogate films, novels, and plays in which space and place figure prominently. Drawing upon A Cultural Atlas of Australia, a database-driven interactive digital map that can be used to identify patterns of representation in Australia’s cultural landscape, the book presents an integrated perspective on the translation of space across narrative forms and pioneers new ways of seeing and understanding landscape. It offers fresh insights on cultural topography and spatial history by examining the technical and conceptual challenges of georeferencing fictional and fictionalized places in narratives. Among the items discussed are Wake in Fright, a novel by Kenneth Cook, adapted iconically to the screen and recently onto the stage; the Australian North as a mythic space; spatial and temporal narrative shifts in retellings of the story of Alexander Pearce, a convict who gained notoriety for resorting to cannibalism after escaping from a remote Tasmanian penal colony; travel narratives and road movies set in Western Australia; and the challenges and spatial politics of mapping spaces for which there are no coordinates.</description>

<date>2016</date>
<type>book</type>
<identifier linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/1959.3/442254</identifier>
<relation>http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=807772</relation>

<rights>Copyright © 2016 by Jane Stadler, Peta Mitchell, and Stephen Carleton. All rights reserved.</rights>


<contributor>Swinburne University of Technology</contributor>

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	            <title>Imagined landscapes: geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives</title>
	
		





	





	
	
	
    
		
		
	
	
	

	
        <type>book</type>
        <date>2016-01-01</date>
																        <creator>Stadler, Jane</creator>
							        <creator>Mitchell, Peta</creator>
							        <creator>Carleton, Stephen</creator>
											
																        <subject>Landscape</subject>
							        <subject>Narrative cartography</subject>
							        <subject>Australian Cultural Studies</subject>
									        
		

		
		

						        	<publisher>Indiana University Press</publisher>
												        			      			      <language>eng</language>
			      					

		


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    </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2016-01-01</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="184460870" url="/work/184460870"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/184460870</troveUrl><title>Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change</title><contributor>Reside, April  E</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Book</type><type>Map</type><type>Article</type><type>Article/Report</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><holdingsCount>6</holdingsCount><versionCount>4</versionCount><relevance score="0.011243337">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet>-refugia-terrestrial-biodiversity. NCCARF Adaptation <b>Research</b> <b>Grants</b> Program, Terrestrial Biodiversity. </snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown" linktext="SLQ">http://hdl.handle.net/10462/pdf/3184</identifier><version id="209156645"><record><title>Climate change refugia for terrestrial biodiversity : defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change / April E. Reside, Jeremy VanDerWal, Ben L. Phillips, Luke P. Shoo, Dan F. Rosauer, Barbara J. Anderson, Justin A. Welbergen, Craig Moritz, Simon Ferrier, Thomas D. Harwood, Kristen J. Williams, Brendan Mackey, Sonia Hugh  , Yvette M. Williams and Stephen E. Williams; co-authors and contributors: Lauren Hodgson, Grant Wardell - Johnson, Gunnar Keppel, John Llewellyn, Justin Perry, Genevieve Perkins, Timothy McVicar, Randal Donahue, Margaret Cawsey, Michael Austin, Nadiah Roslan and  Eric P. Vanderduys.</title><creator type="(author.)">Reside, April E.,</creator><creator type="(issuing body.)">James Cook University</creator><creator type="(sponsoring body.)">National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (Australia)</creator><creator>CSIRO</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">889941941</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000053352289</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Archived website</type><type>Map</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>3</holdingsCount></version><version id="251170852"><record><header><identifier>oai:nuws:uws_42927</identifier><datestamp>2017-10-12T01:27:30Z</datestamp><setSpec>uws_researchCollection</setSpec></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
  
  <subject>climatic changes</subject>
  <subject>biodiversity</subject>
  <subject>wildlife refuges</subject>
  <subject>Australia</subject>
  <identifier>session: UWS_valet-20170710-111510</identifier>
  <relation>ARC DP110104186</relation>
  <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110104186</relation>
  <type>research report</type>
  <title>Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: Defining Areas That Promote Species Persistence and Ecosystem Resilience in the Face of Global Climate Change</title>
  <language>eng</language>
  <identifier>isbn: 9781925039443</identifier>
  <date>2013</date>
  <publisher>Gold Coast, Qld., National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility</publisher>
  
  <format>230 pages</format>
  <identifier>https://www.nccarf.edu.au/sites/default/files/attached_files_publications/Reside_2013_Climate_change_refugia_for_terrestrial_biodiversity.pdf</identifier>
  <description>We are currently facing the likelihood of severe climate change before the close of thecentury. In the face of such a global driver of species loss, we urgently need to identifyrefugia that will shelter species from the worst impacts of climate change. This will bea critical component of successful conservation and management of our biodiversity.Despite this, little is known about how best to identify refugia in the landscape, and thepractical strategies needed to identify, protect and expand refugia are just beginning tobe developed. Identifying refugia that will protect most species, or large numbers ofspecies, remains a complex and daunting endeavour due to the large variations inclimatic and biotic requirements of species.A first step to identifying refugia for biodiversity across Australia is to locate the areaswhich show the least change into the future (i.e. the most environmentally stable),particularly along axes of temperature and precipitation. The second and crucial step isto identify the areas that will retain most of their biodiversity and provide opportunitiesfor additional species to relocate to into the future. Using these approaches in thisproject, we take the first steps to identify refugial areas across the Australian continentunder contemporary climate change scenarios. We find that the southern and easternparts of the continent contain refugia that many species will retreat to over the next 75years, but that the current reserve system may be inadequate to allow species to shiftto and persist in these areas. Disturbingly, we also find that there is a large portion ofthe Australian vertebrate community for which adequate natural refugia do not appearto exist. Fine-scaled regional analyses will be required to clarify these broad findings,and we examine a number of case studies demonstrating how these regional analysesmight best proceed.</description>
  <rights>© 2013 James Cook University and the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the copyright holder.</rights>
  <creator>Reside, April E.</creator>
  <creator>Vanderwal, Jeremy</creator>
  <creator>Phillips, Ben L.</creator>
  <creator>Shoo, Luke P.</creator>
  <creator>Rosauer, Dan F.</creator>
  <creator>Anderson, Barbara J.</creator>
  <creator>Welbergen, Justin A.</creator>
  
  <creator>Moritz, Craig C.</creator>
  <creator>Ferrier, Simon</creator>
  <creator>Harwood , Thomas D.</creator>
  <creator>Williams, Kristen J.</creator>
  <creator>Mackey, Brendan</creator>
  <creator>Hugh, Sonia</creator>
  <creator>Williams, Stephen E.</creator>
  <identifier>http://handle.westernsydney.edu.au:8081/1959.7/uws:42927</identifier>
</dc>
</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NUWS:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Report</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="200892759 206584536"><record><header>
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        <title>Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change</title>
        <creator>Reside, April  E.</creator>
        <creator>VanDerWal, Jeremy</creator>
        <creator>Phillips, Ben L.</creator>
        <creator>Shoo, Luke P.</creator>
        <creator>Rosauer, Dan F.</creator>
        <creator>Anderson, Barbara</creator>
        <creator>Welbergen, Justin A.</creator>
        <creator>Moritz, Craig</creator>
        <creator>Ferrier, Simon</creator>
        <creator>Harwood, Thomas D.</creator>
        <creator>Williams, Kristen J.</creator>
        <creator>Mackey, Brendan</creator>
        <creator>Hugh, Sonia</creator>
        <creator>Williams, Stephen E.</creator>
        <description>We are currently facing the likelihood of severe climate change before the close of the century. In the face of such a global driver of species loss, we urgently need to identify refugia that will shelter species from the worst impacts of climate change. This will be a critical component of successful conservation and management of our biodiversity. Despite this, little is known about how best to identify refugia in the landscape, and the practical strategies needed to identify, protect and expand refugia are just beginning to be developed. Identifying refugia that will protect most species, or large numbers of species, remains a complex and daunting endeavour due to the large variations in climatic and biotic requirements of species. 

A first step to identifying refugia for biodiversity across Australia is to locate the areas which show the least change into the future (i.e. the most environmentally stable), particularly along axes of temperature and precipitation. The second and crucial step is to identify the areas that will retain most of their biodiversity and provide opportunities for additional species to relocate to into the future. Using these approaches in this project, we take the first steps to identify refugial areas across the Australian continent under contemporary climate change scenarios. We find that the southern and eastern parts of the continent contain refugia that many species will retreat to over the next 75 years, but that the current reserve system may be inadequate to allow species to shift to and persist in these areas. Disturbingly, we also find that there is a large portion of the Australian vertebrate community for which adequate natural refugia do not appear to exist. Fine-scaled regional analyses will be required to clarify these broad findings, and we examine a number of case studies demonstrating how these regional analyses might best proceed. 

Lessons learnt across the multiple techniques employed in this study include: 
1. High elevation areas are important refugia. 
2. Tasmania and the east coast of mainland Australia contain most of the key areas for refugia into the future. 
3. Results are dependent on which objectives, techniques, taxonomic groups and climate scenarios are used.</description>
        <publisher>National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility</publisher>
        <date>2013</date>
        <type>book</type>
        
        <format>application/pdf</format>
        <relation>https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/29019/1/TB1108-Reside-Climate-change-refugia-for-terrestrial-biodiversity.pdf</relation>
        <relation>http://www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/climate-change-refugia-terrestrial-biodiversity</relation>
        <relation>  Reside, April E., VanDerWal, Jeremy, Phillips, Ben L., Shoo, Luke P., Rosauer, Dan F., Anderson, Barbara, Welbergen, Justin A., Moritz, Craig, Ferrier, Simon, Harwood, Thomas D., Williams, Kristen J., Mackey, Brendan, Hugh, Sonia, and Williams, Stephen E.  (2013) Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change.    National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.      </relation>
        <relation>https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/29019/</relation>
        <rights>restricted</rights></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QJCU:IR</metadataSource></record><record><header>
      <identifier>oai:eprints.jcu.edu.au:29019</identifier>
      <datestamp>2013-09-02T23:54:07Z</datestamp>
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      <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
        <title>Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change</title>
        <creator>Reside, April  E.</creator>
        <creator>VanDerWal, Jeremy</creator>
        <creator>Phillips, Ben L.</creator>
        <creator>Shoo, Luke P.</creator>
        <creator>Rosauer, Dan F.</creator>
        <creator>Anderson, Barbara</creator>
        <creator>Welbergen, Justin A.</creator>
        <creator>Moritz, Craig</creator>
        <creator>Ferrier, Simon</creator>
        <creator>Harwood, Thomas D.</creator>
        <creator>Williams, Kristen J.</creator>
        <creator>Mackey, Brendan</creator>
        <creator>Hugh, Sonia</creator>
        <creator>Williams, Stephen E.</creator>
        <description>We are currently facing the likelihood of severe climate change before the close of the century. In the face of such a global driver of species loss, we urgently need to identify refugia that will shelter species from the worst impacts of climate change. This will be a critical component of successful conservation and management of our biodiversity. Despite this, little is known about how best to identify refugia in the landscape, and the practical strategies needed to identify, protect and expand refugia are just beginning to be developed. Identifying refugia that will protect most species, or large numbers of species, remains a complex and daunting endeavour due to the large variations in climatic and biotic requirements of species. 

A first step to identifying refugia for biodiversity across Australia is to locate the areas which show the least change into the future (i.e. the most environmentally stable), particularly along axes of temperature and precipitation. The second and crucial step is to identify the areas that will retain most of their biodiversity and provide opportunities for additional species to relocate to into the future. Using these approaches in this project, we take the first steps to identify refugial areas across the Australian continent under contemporary climate change scenarios. We find that the southern and eastern parts of the continent contain refugia that many species will retreat to over the next 75 years, but that the current reserve system may be inadequate to allow species to shift to and persist in these areas. Disturbingly, we also find that there is a large portion of the Australian vertebrate community for which adequate natural refugia do not appear to exist. Fine-scaled regional analyses will be required to clarify these broad findings, and we examine a number of case studies demonstrating how these regional analyses might best proceed. 

Lessons learnt across the multiple techniques employed in this study include: 
1. High elevation areas are important refugia. 
2. Tasmania and the east coast of mainland Australia contain most of the key areas for refugia into the future. 
3. Results are dependent on which objectives, techniques, taxonomic groups and climate scenarios are used.</description>
        <publisher>National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility</publisher>
        <date>2013</date>
        <type>book</type>
        
        <format>application/pdf</format>
        <identifier>http://eprints.jcu.edu.au/29019/1/TB1108%2DReside%2DClimate%2Dchange%2Drefugia%2Dfor%2Dterrestrial%2Dbiodiversity.pdf</identifier>
        <relation>http://www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/climate-change-refugia-terrestrial-biodiversity</relation>
        <identifier>Reside, April E., VanDerWal, Jeremy, Phillips, Ben L., Shoo, Luke P., Rosauer, Dan F., Anderson, Barbara, Welbergen, Justin A., Moritz, Craig, Ferrier, Simon, Harwood, Thomas D., Williams, Kristen J., Mackey, Brendan, Hugh, Sonia, and Williams, Stephen E. (2013) Climate Change Refugia for Terrestrial Biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. </identifier>
        <relation>http://eprints.jcu.edu.au/29019/</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QJCU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="219701682"><record><title>Climate change refugia for terrestrial biodiversity : Defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change / authors: April E. Reside [and 14 others].</title><creator type="(author.)">Reside, April E.,</creator><creator type="(issuing body.)">National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (Australia)</creator><creator type="(host institution.)">James Cook University</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="isbn">9781925039443</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">930071967</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000056419831</identifier><bibliographicCitation type="edition">Final report.</bibliographicCitation><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><type>Book/Illustrated</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work></records></zone><zone name="picture"><records s="0" n="16" total="16"><work id="156800790" url="/work/156800790"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/156800790</troveUrl><title>Jane Mathews during an oral history interview at the National Library of Australia, 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Mackenzie.</title><creator>Mackenzie, Craig, 1969-</creator><creator>National Library of Australia</creator><issued>2011</issued><publisher>Canberra : National Library of Australia,</publisher><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">754602348</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000047766088</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="182743934" url="/work/182743934"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/182743934</troveUrl><title>Portraits of Mary Hiscock during an oral history interview with Kim Rubenstein at the National Library of Australia, 29 August 2011 / Sam Cooper</title><contributor>Cooper, Samuel, 1982-</contributor><issued>2011</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="3.6240718">very relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-132234622</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-132234622-t</identifier><version id="199081398"><record><title>Portraits of Mary Hiscock during an oral history interview with Kim Rubenstein at the National Library of Australia, 29 August 2011 / Sam Cooper.</title><creator type="(photographer.)">Cooper, Samuel, 1982-,</creator><creator type="(issuing body)">National Library of Australia</creator><issued>2011</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">853613304</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000051752852</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="181759552" url="/work/181759552"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/181759552</troveUrl><title>Eve Mahlab during an oral history interview at the National Library of Australia, Canberra, 30 August 2010 / Sam Cooper</title><contributor>Cooper, Samuel, 1982-</contributor><issued>2010</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.888903">very relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-132146272</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-132146272-t</identifier><version id="198020422"><record><title>Eve Mahlab during an oral history interview at the National Library of Australia, Canberra, 30 August 2010 / Sam Cooper.</title><creator type="(photographer.)">Cooper, Samuel, 1982-,</creator><creator type="(issuing body)">National Library of Australia</creator><issued>2010</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000051643094</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">850912093</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2010</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="221531859" url="/work/221531859"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/221531859</troveUrl><title>Expert to weigh up brain-zap devices</title><contributor>Gilbert, F</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.029158417">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114638</identifier><version id="242984558"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:114638</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-03-10</datestamp>
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  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Expert to weigh up brain-zap devices</title>
      <creator>Gilbert, F</creator>
      <subject>Philosophy and Religious Studies, Applied Ethics, Ethical Use of New Technology (e.g. Nanotechnology, Biotechnology)</subject>
      <publisher>Fairfax Media</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>interview</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>image/jpeg</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114638/1/Mercury.jpg</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE150101390</relation>
      <relation>Gilbert, F, Expert to weigh up brain-zap devices, The Mercury, Fairfax Media, Hobart (2016) [Media Interview]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114638</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="228983773" url="/work/228983773"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/228983773</troveUrl><title>Forests: Interplay of Human and Natural Disturbances on Pattern and Process in Forest Ecosystems</title><contributor>Brook, B</contributor><issued>2017</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.029158417">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/122676</identifier><version id="251674048"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:122676</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-12-07</datestamp>
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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Forests: Interplay of Human and Natural Disturbances on Pattern and Process in Forest Ecosystems</title>
      <creator>Brook, B</creator>
      <creator>Buettel, JC</creator>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Other Biological Sciences, Global Change Biology</subject>
      <publisher>M D P I AG</publisher>
      <date>2017</date>
      <type>journal</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
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      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FL160100101</relation>
      <relation>Brook, B and Buettel, JC, Forests: Interplay of Human and Natural Disturbances on Pattern and Process in Forest Ecosystems ISSN 1999-4907 (2017) [Edited Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/122676</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2017</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="228983772" url="/work/228983772"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/228983772</troveUrl><title>Biology Letters: Biology of Extinction</title><contributor>Brook, B</contributor><issued>2017</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.029158417">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/122675</identifier><version id="251674047"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:122675</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-12-07</datestamp>
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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Biology Letters: Biology of Extinction</title>
      <creator>Brook, B</creator>
      <creator>Alroy, J</creator>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Evolutionary Biology, Speciation and Extinction</subject>
      <publisher>The Royal Society Publishing</publisher>
      <date>2017</date>
      <type>journal</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>image/jpeg</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/122675/1/Brook & Alroy - Biol Lett SI 2017.JPG</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FL160100101</relation>
      <relation>Brook, B and Alroy, J, Biology Letters: Biology of Extinction ISSN 1744-9561 (2017) [Edited Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/122675</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2017</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191087799" url="/work/191087799"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191087799</troveUrl><title>Artificial light, Beijing</title><contributor>Cliff, Thomas</contributor><issued>2014-2015</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.027083322">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/1885/11684</identifier><version id="208401650"><record><header><identifier>oai:digitalcollections.anu.edu.au:1885/11684</identifier><datestamp>2015-12-08T07:59:35Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_1885_9051</setSpec><setSpec>com_1885_1</setSpec><setSpec>col_1885_26</setSpec></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>Artificial light, Beijing</title>
<creator>Cliff, Thomas</creator>
<subject>social change</subject>
<subject>inequality</subject>
<subject>capitalism</subject>
<subject>existentialism</subject>
<subject>photo essay</subject>
<description>Prologue: A Sort of Darkness
There’s a man who sits selling spicy tofu and vegetables on skewers in a not-yet redeveloped area, no more than thirty30 metres wide, between Beijing University and the Ffourth Rring road. Beyond the twelve12 or fourteen14 lines of traffic to his south is the hyper-modernity of Zhongguancun, but he finds his place in this liminal strip: anti-aspiration between aspirational heights. He is no longer young, but not- yet middle aged. He stays in that one spot for twelve12 hours a day, midday to midnight, every day. When he is not actively serving a customer, he just sits there, almost motionless and completely expressionless; he doesn’t look happy or sad, and my chest tightens each time I walk past.</description>
<date>2014-05-19T01:08:02Z</date>
<date>2014-05-19T01:08:02Z</date>
<date>2014-02-18</date>
<date>2015-12-08T07:59:35Z</date>
<type>Image</type>
<identifier linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/1885/11684</identifier>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/fl120100155</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/dp140101289</relation>
<rights>Copyright the author.</rights>
<publisher>Australian Centre on China in the World, The Australian National University</publisher>
<source>The China Story</source>
<source>http://www.thechinastory.org/2014/01/artificial-light-beijing/</source>
</dc>
</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">ANU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2014</issued><issued>2014-2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="205989482" url="/work/205989482"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/205989482</troveUrl><title>Chemical Species</title><contributor>Kirksey, EE</contributor><issued>2015-2016</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.022486674">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/unsworks_38526</identifier><version id="252611706"><record><header>

      <identifier>oai:unsworks.library.unsw.edu.au:1959.4/unsworks_38526</identifier>

      <datestamp>2018-01-23T18:03:42Z</datestamp>

	  </header><metadata>

    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd"><identifier>http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/unsworks_38526</identifier>
   <type>mixed material</type>
   <type>curatorial output</type>
   <type>Exhibition</type>
   <title>Chemical Species</title>
   <creator>Kirksey, EE</creator>
   <creator>Shapiro, N</creator>
   <relation>https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6067-1525</relation>
   <description>Our world is nearly always in a state of change.  Imperceptible forces work around, against, or in spite of our attempts to control and catalog them.  Chemical species change quickly.  Encounters between organic matter and inorganic matter—between rock and water, among biological organisms, metabolites, and toxins—generate unexpected possibilities and uncanny haunting specters.  Objects collected for this installation—bent forks from a meth lab, images and chemical traces from a Kodak Film plant, and material from the Marcellus Shale—illustrate human entanglements with interdependent chemical systems.</description>
   <rights>https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/</rights>
   <identifier />
   <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE140100918</relation>
   <date>2015-10-22</date>
   <date>2016-01-20</date>
   <coverage>Princeton University, Aaron Burr Hall, Department of Anthropology, Princeton, NJ</coverage>
   <format>3</format>
   <format>Clay, metal, photographs, water, chemicals.</format>
</dc>
 

    </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NUN:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2015-2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="3938751" url="/work/3938751"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/3938751</troveUrl><title>Less popular but more democratic? Corrie, Clarkson and the dancing Cru</title><contributor>Hartley, John</contributor><issued>2009</issued><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Article</type><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>2</holdingsCount><versionCount>2</versionCount><relevance score="0.019150801">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="restricted">http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/42606</identifier><version id="50015634"><record><header>
      <identifier>oai:eprints.qut.edu.au:25965</identifier>
      <datestamp>2015-10-10T16:21:01Z</datestamp>
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      <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
        <title>Less popular but more democratic? Corrie, Clarkson and the dancing Cru</title>
        <creator>Hartley, John</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>The central cultural experience of modernity has been change, both the ‘creative destruction’ of existing structures, and the growth, often exponential, of new knowledge. During the twentieth century, the central cultural platform for the collective experience of modernising societies changed too, from page and stage to the screen – from publishing, the press and radio to cinema, television and latterly computer screens. Despite the successive dominance of new media, none has lasted long at the top. The pattern for each was to give way to a successor platform in popularity, but to continue as part of an increasingly crowded media menu. Modern media are supplemented not supplanted by their successors.</description>
        <publisher>Routledge</publisher>
        <contributor>Turner, Graeme</contributor>
        <contributor>Tay, Jinna</contributor>
        <date>2009</date>
        <type>book chapter</type>
        <format>image/jpeg</format>
        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/25965/1/TV_After_TV_Cover.jpg</relation>
        <relation>http://www.routledgemedia.com/books/Television-Studies-After-TV-isbn9780415477703</relation>
        <relation>   Hartley, John   (2009)   Less popular but more democratic? Corrie, Clarkson and the dancing Cru.  In Turner, Graeme & Tay, Jinna (Eds.) Television Studies After TV : Understanding Television in the Post-Broadcast Era.   Routledge, London ; New York, pp. 20-30.    </relation>
        <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0879596 </relation>
        <identifier>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/25965/</identifier>
        <rights>Copyright 2009 John Hartley</rights>
        <source>ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation; Creative Industries Faculty</source><subject>Communication Studies (200101)</subject><subject>Media Studies (200104)</subject><subject>Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)</subject><subject>Screen and Media Culture (200212)</subject><subject>Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified (200299)</subject><subject>Television studies</subject><subject>media</subject><subject>broadcast TV</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Photograph</type><issued>2009</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="250814199"><record><header><identifier>oai:espace.curtin.edu.au:20.500.11937/42606</identifier><datestamp>2017-09-13T14:24:47Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_20.500.11937_1</setSpec><setSpec>col_20.500.11937_3</setSpec></header><metadata><qualifieddc schemaLocation="http://purl.org/dc/terms/ http://dublincore.org/schemas/xmls/qdc/2006/01/06/dcterms.xsd http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/ http://dublincore.org/schemas/xmls/qdc/2006/01/06/dc.xsd">
<title>Less popular but more democratic?: Corrie, Clarkson and the dancing Cru</title>
<creator>Hartley, John</creator>
<abstract>No Abstract Available</abstract>
<dateAccepted>2017-01-30T15:00:47Z</dateAccepted>
<available>2017-01-30T15:00:47Z</available>
<created>2017-01-30T15:00:47Z</created>
<issued>2009</issued>
<type>book chapter</type>
<relation>http://doi.org/10.4324/9780203878316</relation><relation>http://doi.org/10.4324/9780203878316</relation>
<isPartOf type="series">Television Studies After TV: Understanding Television in the Post-Broadcast Era</isPartOf>
<bibliographicCitation type="isbn">0203878310</bibliographicCitation>
<identifier type="dcterms:URI" linktype="restricted">http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/42606</identifier>
</qualifieddc>
</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">WCU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Book chapter</type><issued>2009</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="179518380" url="/work/179518380"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/179518380</troveUrl><title>Exploring emotional climate in preservice science teacher education</title><contributor>Bellocchi, Alberto</contributor><contributor> Ritchie, Stephen M</contributor><contributor> Tobin, Kenneth</contributor><contributor> Sandhu, Maryam</contributor><contributor> Sandhu, Satwant</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Photograph</type><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.014579209">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> <b>research</b>, little is known about the ways in which social interactions and different subject matter mediate</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">https://eprints.qut.edu.au/59652/</identifier><version id="195388576"><record><header>
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        <title>Exploring emotional climate in preservice science teacher education</title>
        <creator>Bellocchi, Alberto</creator>
        <creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator>
        <creator>Tobin, Kenneth</creator>
        <creator>Sandhu, Maryam</creator>
        <creator>Sandhu, Satwant</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>Classroom emotional climates are interrelated with students’ engagement with university courses. Despite growing interest in emotions and emotional climate research, little is known about the ways in which social interactions and different subject matter mediate emotional climates in preservice science teacher education classes. In this study we investigated the emotional climate and associated classroom interactions in a preservice science teacher education class. We were interested in the ways in which salient classroom interactions were related to the emotional climate during lessons centered on debates about science-based issues (e.g., nuclear energy alternatives). Participants used audience response technology to indicate their perceptions of the emotional climate. Analysis of conversation for salient video clips and analysis of non-verbal conduct (acoustic parameters, body movements, and facial expressions) supplemented emotional climate data. One key contribution that this study makes to preservice science teacher education is to identify the micro-processes of successful and unsuccessful class interactions that were associated with positive and neutral emotional climate. The structure of these interactions can inform the practice of other science educators who wish to produce positive emotional climates in their classes. The study also extends and explicates the construct of intensity of emotional climate.</description>
        <publisher>Springer</publisher>
        <date>2013-09</date>
        <type>journal article</type>
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        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/59652/1/Exploring_emotional_climate_in_preservice_science_teacher_education_FINAL.pdf</relation>
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        <relation>DOI:10.1007/s11422-013-9526-3</relation><relation>http://doi.org/10.1007/s11422-013-9526-3</relation>
        <relation>   Bellocchi, Alberto, Ritchie, Stephen M., Tobin, Kenneth, Sandhu, Maryam,  & Sandhu, Satwant   (2013)    Exploring emotional climate in preservice science teacher education.  Cultural Studies of Science Education, 8(3), pp. 529-552.    </relation>
        <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP120100369</relation>
        <identifier>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/59652/</identifier>
        <rights>Copyright 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht</rights>
        <rights>The final publication is available at link.springer.com</rights>
        <source>Faculty of Education</source><subject>Higher Education (130103)</subject><subject>Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified (130299)</subject><subject>Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators (130313)</subject><subject>Emotional Climate</subject><subject>Classroom Climate</subject><subject>Interaction Ritual Theory</subject><subject>Learning Environment</subject><subject>Sociology of Emotions</subject><subject>Class Debates</subject><subject>Socioscientific issues</subject><subject>Socio-scientific issues</subject><subject>Preservice science teacher education</subject><subject>Teacher Education</subject><subject>HERN</subject><subject>emotional experience</subject><subject> affective experience</subject><subject> emotional response</subject><subject> emotional development</subject><subject> emotional patterns</subject><subject> emotional attitudes</subject><subject> affective behaviour</subject><subject> affective measures</subject><subject> affective education</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><type>Photograph</type><issued>2013-09</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="169483792" url="/work/169483792"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/169483792</troveUrl><title>Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science: the evolving case of hybridized writing</title><contributor>Ritchie, Stephen M</contributor><contributor> Tomas, Louisa</contributor><contributor> Shavinina, Larisa V</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Article</type><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>2</holdingsCount><versionCount>2</versionCount><relevance score="0.014579209">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> project, and identifies future directions for further development and <b>research</b>. Innovations are usually attributed to idea</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">https://eprints.qut.edu.au/61691/</identifier><version id="199612254 208392988"><record><header>
      <identifier>oai:researchonline.jcu.edu.au:19429</identifier>
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        <title>Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science: the evolving case of hybridized writing</title>
        <creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator>
        <creator>Tomas, Louisa</creator>
        <description>Innovations are usually attributed to ideas generated in the minds of individuals. As we reflect upon the evolving design of an online project to engage students in learning science through hybridized writing activities we propose a more distributed view of the process of innovative design. That is, our experience suggests ideas are generated in the activity of interacting with human and material resources that expand and constrain possibilities. This project is innovative in that it is a new educational response to the problem of disengagement of students in science, and has proven to be effective in changing classroom practice and improving students' scientific literacy. In this chapter, we identify the antecedents and trace the evolution of the project. This account illuminates the innovative design process, presents a summary of the evidence for the effectiveness of the project, and identifies future directions for further development and research.</description>
        <publisher>Routledge</publisher>
        <contributor>Shavinina, Larisa V.</contributor>
        <date>2013</date>
        <type>book chapter</type>
        
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        <relation>http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415682213/</relation>
        <relation>  Ritchie, Stephen M., and Tomas, Louisa  (2013) Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science: the evolving case of hybridized writing.   In: Shavinina, Larisa V., (ed.) The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education.   Routledge, New York, NY, USA, pp. 385-395.      </relation>
        <relation>https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/19429/</relation>
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      <datestamp>2014-04-11T04:27:00Z</datestamp>
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        <title>Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science : the evolving case of hybridized writing</title>
        <creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator>
        <creator>Tomas, Louisa</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>Innovations are usually attributed to ideas generated in the minds of individuals. As we reflect upon the evolving design of an online project to engage students in learning science through hybridized writing activities we propose a more distributed view of the process of innovative design. That is, our experience suggests ideas are generated in the activity of interacting with human and material resources that expand and constrain possibilities. This project is innovative in that it is a new educational response to the problem of disengagement of students in science, and has proven to be effective in changing classroom practice and improving students’ scientific literacy. In this chapter, we identify the antecedents and trace the evolution of the project. This account illuminates the innovative design process, presents a summary of the evidence for the effectiveness of the project, and identifies future directions for further development and research.
Keywords: Science learning, hybridized writing, case study, innovative approach
</description>
        <publisher>Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)</publisher>
        <contributor>Shavinina, Larisa V.</contributor>
        <date>2013</date>
        <type>book chapter</type>
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        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/61691/2/61691.pdf</relation>
        <relation>http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415682213/</relation>
        <relation>   Ritchie, Stephen M. & Tomas, Louisa   (2013)   Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science : the evolving case of hybridized writing.  In Shavinina, Larisa V. (Ed.) The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education.   Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), New York, pp. 385-395.    </relation>
        <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110200368</relation>
        <identifier>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/61691/</identifier>
        <rights>Copyright 2013 Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)</rights>
        <source>School of Teacher Education & Leadership; Faculty of Education</source><subject>CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY (130200)</subject><subject>science learning</subject><subject>hybridized writing</subject><subject>case study</subject><subject>innovative approach</subject><subject>HERN</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Book chapter</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>2</holdingsCount></version><version id="184710970"><record><header>
      <identifier>oai:eprints.jcu.edu.au:19429</identifier>
      <datestamp>2013-05-17T08:08:27Z</datestamp>
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        <title>Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science: the evolving case of hybridized writing</title>
        <creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator>
        <creator>Tomas, Louisa</creator>
        <description>Innovations are usually attributed to ideas generated in the minds of individuals. As we reflect upon the evolving design of an online project to engage students in learning science through hybridized writing activities we propose a more distributed view of the process of innovative design. That is, our experience suggests ideas are generated in the activity of interacting with human and material resources that expand and constrain possibilities. This project is innovative in that it is a new educational response to the problem of disengagement of students in science, and has proven to be effective in changing classroom practice and improving students' scientific literacy. In this chapter, we identify the antecedents and trace the evolution of the project. This account illuminates the innovative design process, presents a summary of the evidence for the effectiveness of the project, and identifies future directions for further development and research.</description>
        <publisher>Routledge</publisher>
        <contributor>Shavinina, Larisa V.</contributor>
        <date>2013</date>
        <type>Book Chapter</type>
        
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        <relation>http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415682213/</relation>
        <identifier>Ritchie, Stephen M., and Tomas, Louisa (2013) Designing an innovative approach to engage students in learning science: the evolving case of hybridized writing. In: The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Routledge, New York, NY, USA, pp. 385-395. </identifier>
        <relation>http://eprints.jcu.edu.au/19429/</relation></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QJCU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Photograph</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="213497872" url="/work/213497872"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/213497872</troveUrl><title>What works? Emerging issues</title><contributor>Osborne, Lindy</contributor><contributor> Imms, Wesley</contributor><contributor> Cleveland, Benjamin</contributor><contributor> Fisher, Kenn</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Photograph</type><type>Article</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.012293411">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> Arts</i> (Kostof, 1977). This chapter contextualises previous <b>research</b></snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">https://eprints.qut.edu.au/98943/</identifier><version id="234414683"><record><header>
      <identifier>oai:eprints.qut.edu.au:98943</identifier>
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        <title>What works? Emerging issues</title>
        <creator>Osborne, Lindy</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>Emerging learning environments for architectural education
Diversification and expansion of global higher education in the 21st century, has resulted in learning environments in architectural education that can no longer be sustained by the <i>Beaux-Arts Atelier model</i>. Budgetary pressures, surging student numbers, extensions to traditional curricula, evolving competency standards and accreditation requirements, and modified geographical and pedagogical boundaries are pointing the spotlight on the need for a review of the design of learning environments in the higher education context. The <i>Architects Accreditation Council of Australia [AACA]</i> course accreditation requirements dictate a 1:17 minimum staff/student teaching ratio as well as some aspects of space provision. Unsustainable specifications are driving the need to review pedagogical practices. 

The influx of new digital technologies and largely ubiquitous access to affordable Wi-Fi-enabled mobile devices has helped to democratise knowledge and is transforming when, where and how students learn; and this is having an impact on the types of spaces required to support effective learning. The traditional lecture theatre, with the teacher as sole conveyor of knowledge, is graciously now becoming a memory of the past. More efficient design of space that responds to this digital (r)evolution, has the potential to contribute significantly to savings in provision and management of learning environments.

Although many studies globally, and particularly those in the United Kingdom, have examined learning environment design, few studies have focussed specifically on the design of studio learning environments or the design of these environments for architectural education, especially in Australia. While facing comparable changes and pressures, architecture continues to be taught in similar environments and using similar pedagogical approaches, to those first developed when it moved from an apprenticeship model to national higher education systems, in the early nineteenth century at the <i>École des Beaux Arts</i> (Kostof, 1977). This chapter contextualises previous research in this area and provides additional insight into the emerging issues in the design of learning environments for architectural education in Australia. Using a grounded theory and thematic analysis mixed methodology, data obtained over a three-year period were interpreted to understand the significant relationships between spatial, technological and pedagogical contexts and the impact that these have on teaching architecture students and preparing them for professional practice. 

While definitions vary, in this chapter, ‘learning environments’ refers to the spatial, technological, social and pedagogical contexts within which learning occurs and which have an impact on student engagement, achievement and attitude. The description includes physical learning environments, blended and virtual environments, spaces and places, and on-campus and off-campus formal and informal environments.</description>
        <publisher>Sense Publishers</publisher>
        <contributor>Imms, Wesley</contributor>
        <contributor>Cleveland, Benjamin</contributor>
        <contributor>Fisher, Kenn</contributor>
        <date>2016-08-02</date>
        <type>book chapter</type>
        <format>image/tiff</format>
        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/98943/3/Fig%2001_Final.tiff</relation>
        <format>image/tiff</format>
        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/98943/4/Fig%2002_Final.tiff</relation>
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        <relation>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/98943/21/98943.pdf</relation>
        <relation>https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/advances-in-learning-environments-research/evaluating-learning-environments/</relation>
        <relation>   Osborne, Lindy   (2016)   What works? Emerging issues.  In Imms, Wesley, Cleveland, Benjamin,  & Fisher, Kenn (Eds.) Evaluating Learning Environments Snapshots of Emerging Issues, Methods and Knowledge.   Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, pp. 45-63.    </relation>
        <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP130100880</relation>
        <identifier>https://eprints.qut.edu.au/98943/</identifier>
        <rights>Copyright 2016 Sense Publishers</rights>
        <source>Creative Industries Faculty; QUT Design Lab</source><subject>ARCHITECTURE (120100)</subject><subject>Architectural Design (120101)</subject><subject>CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY (130200)</subject><subject>Learning Environments</subject><subject>Architectural Education</subject><subject>Design Studio</subject><subject>Space</subject><subject>Technology</subject><subject>Pedagogy</subject><subject>Context</subject><subject>HERN</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Book chapter</type><type>Photograph</type><issued>2016-08-02</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="223257668" url="/work/223257668"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/223257668</troveUrl><title>Libidinal Circuits</title><contributor>Hemelryk Donald, SJ</contributor><issued>2015</issued><type>Photograph</type><type>Video</type><type>Sound/Recorded music</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.012293411">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> outcome of my <b>research</b> into child migration. Liverpool was a major site of embarkation (and arrival) during</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/unsworks_43777</identifier><version id="252614445"><record><header>

      <identifier>oai:unsworks.library.unsw.edu.au:1959.4/unsworks_43777</identifier>

      <datestamp>2018-07-25T23:24:57Z</datestamp>

	  </header><metadata>

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    <identifier>http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/unsworks_43777</identifier>
    
    <type>mixed material</type>
    
    <type>curatorial output</type>
    <type>Exhibition</type>
    
    <title>Libidinal Circuits</title>
    
    <creator>Hemelryk Donald, SJ</creator>
    
    <creator>Baker, E</creator>
    
    <creator>McKinley, R</creator>
    
    <relation>https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9435-7905</relation>
    
    <description>This conference and exhibition was devised and implemented as an outcome of my research into child migration. Liverpool was a major site of embarkation (and arrival) during the 19th century and its character as a city of the sea persists today. It was therefore a fitting environment in which to open up questions of imperial circuitry and the contemporary era. Academics and artists were invited to submit work that spoke to the Libidinal Circuits of empire (the term is borrowed from Lyotard). Six works were chosen for exhibition and a two day conference was arranged in parallel. The partners were FACT, a major gallery and digital arts centre in the North West of England, and the Culture of Cities Centre at York University, Toronto. Their involvement  was an outcome of a keynote I gave on child migration at their conference the previous year in Toronto (2014).The rubric of the exhibition and conference ran as follows: The Centre for Architecture and Visual Arts (CAVA), the School of the Arts, University of Liverpool, the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT) and the Culture of Cities Centre co-organised the 3rd Annual Conference of the International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC).How can art and advanced theory make reference to the libidinal circuit of the city, its sensuality, desire, hallucinations and its rationality, fears and transgressions? We invite papers and presentations that deal with innovation and its tensions between progress and recalcitrance, of imaginary conceptions of time, space, fluidity and inertia. The aim of this conference is to open up the urban circuits of desire and to analyse the allegiances and fractures of urban life and the special role that art and the artist plays in rendering and intervening in this system.Social change in cities has affective consequences that invariably need to be understood and traced as systems of desire. To speak of the libidinal circuits of the urban is to begin to identify bodies and circulatory flows as inflections and indicators of the spirit of inhabitants embodied within the systems, invisible networks and visible regimes of the city. By taking into account the conscious and unconscious ways in which pathways are produced, maintained and possibly disrupted, libidinal circuits include everything from social policy and engineering, to the initiatives and dreams of art and creative endeavours, to sex, food, religion, politics, fashion, advertising, business and philosophy.</description>
    
    <subject>migratory</subject>
    <subject>visual arts</subject>
    <subject>Tampa and Australia</subject>
    <subject>Photography</subject>
    
    <relation>See also:; http://www.fact.co.uk/projects/libidinal-circuits-scenes-of-urban-innovation-iii.aspx http://www.fact.co.uk/get-involved/researcher/libidinal-circuits.aspx</relation>
    
    <rights>https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/</rights>
    
    <identifier>https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/arts/libidinalcircuits/</identifier>
    
    <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100007</relation>
    
    <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100007</relation>
    
    <date>2015-07-08</date>
    
    <date>2015-07-10</date>
    
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    <format>Video Installation, Photography, Sculpture and sound technology; recorded music</format>
    
    <format>This was an international collaboration involving speakers ad artists from Canada, the UK and Australia.</format>
</dc>
 

    </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NUN:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Recorded music</type><type>Video</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="232447426" url="/work/232447426"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/232447426</troveUrl><title>Film, photography and new digital media in anthropology today</title><contributor>Stefanoff, L</contributor><issued>2017</issued><type>Photograph</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.012293411">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">https://nomadit.co.uk/shiftingstates/conferencesuite.php/panels/5963</identifier><version id="256655454"><record><header>

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    <title>Film, photography and new digital media in anthropology today</title>
    
    <creator>Stefanoff, L</creator>
    
    <creator>Offler, N</creator>
    
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    <description>Two curated days in the 2017 AAS 'Shifting States' Screen/Media/Art program. Screenings of short and feature documentaries, student and experimental films from around the world, talks on Australian collaborative media projects and a special session on photography in anthropology.</description>
    
    <subject>Australia</subject>
    <subject>Antarctica</subject>
    <subject>Peru</subject>
    <subject>USA</subject>
    <subject>Zimbabwe</subject>
    <subject>Song</subject>
    <subject>Cultural survival</subject>
    <subject>Social justice</subject>
    <subject>State violence</subject>
    <subject>Experimental film</subject>
    <subject>Sensory ethnography</subject>
    <subject>Photography</subject>
    <subject>Exhibitions</subject>
    <subject>Collaboration</subject>
    <subject>Indigenous</subject>
    <subject>Anangu</subject>
    <subject>Yolgnu</subject>
    <subject>Maori</subject>
    <subject>Aoteroa / New Zealand</subject>
    <subject>Anthropocene</subject>
    <subject>Visual anthropology</subject>
    <subject>Environmental humanities</subject>
    <subject>Eco-anxiety</subject>
    
    <relation>Research Background: This program addressed 3 key questions: 1/ how are established and emerging anthropologist-screen media makers and others collaborating to make new works on themes of cultural survival, social/political justice, the anthropocene and the spirit life of images? 2/ where do photography-based anthropology projects sit today in a sea of moving images? 3/ What can experimental ethnographic narrative and sensory ethnography experiments offer to anthropocenic/environmental humanities research?Research Contribution: Curated screenings of short and award-winning feature documentaries, student and experimental films from Australia, NZ, USA, Brazil, and Denmark presenting stories from Central Australia, Gapuwiak, Antarctica, New York, West Virginia, Zimbabwe, Timor Leste, Peru and Aotearoa with filmmaker/subject talks and live and video-linked Q&As.Program included 2 special sessions by Anangu and Yolgnu people and the anthropologists they've worked with about the creation of new films and other collaborative media projects.Research Significance: Cultural survival, social/political justice, the anthropocene and the spirit life of images are central themes in my research. I curated the films in this program to showcase some of the ways in which anthropologists continue to use short and long form documentary-making as practices of participation in pressing social, cultural and political processes and how experimental ethnographic narrative and experiments in sensory ethnography are providing intersectional spaces for trans-discplinary anthropology/environmental humanities research. Presentations of new media work by Yolgnu and Anangu people provided audiences with opportunities for Indigenous creatives from bush communities to engage directly with new audiences for their work. Video-linked conversations with filmmakers and subject/collaborators in Peru and the USA provided opportunities for direct engagement on issues of state violence and First Nations cultural survival. Video-link to Chile opened a long-form experimental cli-fi film up to discussion about the aesthetics of eco-anxiety, sublimity and linked to my curated 2016 program '+2 degrees'.*Note, although listed as a conference 'panel' on the URL provided, this program was publicly accessible, also called 'Screen/Media/Art Lab02'. 30-50 people attended every session across 2 days.</relation>
    
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    <identifier>https://nomadit.co.uk/shiftingstates/conferencesuite.php/panels/5963</identifier>
    
    <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE140101607</relation>
    
    <date>2017-12-13</date>
    
    <date>2017-12-15</date>
    
    <coverage>University of Adelaide, Adelaide</coverage>
    
    <format>13</format>
    
    <format>9 films, 3 film and photorgraphy-based talks, 1 mixed-media presentation</format>
    
    <format>ARC DECRA</format>
</dc>
 

    </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NUN:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Photograph</type><issued>2017</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="203463031" url="/work/203463031"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/203463031</troveUrl><title>Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher education
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        <title>Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher education class in Bhutan</title>
        <creator>Rinchen, Sonam</creator>
        <creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator>
        <creator>Bellocchi, Alberto</creator>
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        <description>This study explored pre-service secondary science teachers’ perceptions of classroom emotional climate in the context of the Bhutanese macro-social policy of Gross National Happiness. Drawing upon sociological perspectives of human emotions and using Interaction Ritual Theory this study investigated how pre-service science teachers may be supported in their professional development. It was a multi-method study involving video and audio recordings of teaching episodes supported by interviews and the researcher’s diary. Students also registered their perceptions of the emotional climate of their classroom at 3-minute intervals using audience response technology. In this way, emotional events were identified for video analysis. The findings of this study highlighted that the activities pre-service teachers engaged in matter to them. Positive emotional climate was identified in activities involving students’ presentations using video clips and models, coteaching, and interactive whole class discussions. Decreases in emotional climate were identified during formal lectures and when unprepared presenters led presentations. Emotions such as frustration and disappointment characterized classes with negative emotional climate. The enabling conditions to sustain a positive emotional climate are identified. Implications for sustaining macro-social policy about Gross National Happiness are considered in light of the climate that develops in science teacher education classes.</description>
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        <relation>   Rinchen, Sonam, Ritchie, Stephen M.,  & Bellocchi, Alberto   (2016)    Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher education class in Bhutan.  Cultural Studies of Science Education, 11(3), pp. 603-628.    </relation>
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        <rights>Copyright 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht</rights>
        <rights>The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11422-014-9658-0</rights>
        <source>Children & Youth Research Centre; Division of Research and Commercialisation; Faculty of Education</source><subject>CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY (130200)</subject><subject>Science Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy (130212)</subject><subject>Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators (130313)</subject><subject>emotional climate</subject><subject>emotion</subject><subject>science education</subject><subject>sociology of emotion</subject><subject>teacher education</subject><subject>Gross National Happiness</subject><subject>Affect</subject><subject>Higher Education</subject><subject>HERN</subject><subject>emotional experience</subject><subject> affective experience</subject><subject> emotional response</subject><subject> emotional development</subject><subject> emotional patterns</subject><subject> emotional attitudes</subject><subject> affective behaviour</subject><subject> affective measures</subject><subject> affective education</subject></dc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">QUT:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Article</type><type>Article/Journal or magazine article</type><type>Photograph</type><issued>2016-09</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version><version id="232840558"><record><identifier type="galeAccessionNumber">461132977</identifier><bibliographicCitation type="yearIssued">2016</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="dateIssued">Sept</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="volume">11</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="issue">3</bibliographicCitation><issued type="dcterms:W3CDTF">2016-09-01</issued><title>Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher education
class in Bhutan.(Report)</title><language>English</language><alternative>Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher
education class in Bhutan.</alternative><creator>Rinchen, Sonam</creator><creator>Ritchie, Stephen M.</creator><creator>Bellocchi, Alberto</creator><description type="byline">Sonam Rinchen, Stephen M. Ritchie, Alberto Bellocchi</description><bibliographicCitation type="pagination">603(26)</bibliographicCitation><subject>Teachers -- Analysis</subject><subject>Teachers -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Greenhouse effect -- Analysis</subject><subject>Greenhouse effect -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Sciences education -- Analysis</subject><subject>Sciences education -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Professional development -- Analysis</subject><subject>Professional development -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><type>Report</type><subject>Teachers -- Analysis</subject><subject>Teachers -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Greenhouse effect -- Analysis</subject><subject>Greenhouse effect -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Science education -- Analysis</subject><subject>Science education -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject>Professional development -- Analysis</subject><subject>Professional development -- Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Analysis</subject><subject type="topicalScope">Rites, ceremonies and celebrations</subject><isPartOf code="GALE5HJZ" type="publication">Cultural Studies of Science Education</isPartOf><publisher>Springer</publisher><audience>Academic</audience><medium type="publication">Magazine/Journal article</medium><subject>Education</subject><rights type="publisher">COPYRIGHT 2016 Springer</rights><bibliographicCitation type="issn">1871-1502</bibliographicCitation><rights type="metadata">Copyright 2016 Gale, Cengage Learning.  All rights
reserved.</rights><abstract type="author">
  To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of
this article, please visit this link:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11422-014-9658-0

  Byline: Sonam Rinchen (1), Stephen M. Ritchie (2), Alberto
Bellocchi (3)

  Keywords:

  Emotional climate; Emotion; Preservice teachers; Teacher emotions;
Science education; Sociology of emotion; Gross National Happiness

  Abstract:

  This study explored pre-service secondary science teachers'
perceptions of classroom emotional climate in the context of the
Bhutanese macro-social policy of Gross National Happiness. Drawing upon
sociological perspectives of human emotions and using Interaction Ritual
Theory this study investigated how pre-service science teachers may be
supported in their professional development. It was a multi-method study
involving video and audio recordings of teaching episodes supported by
interviews and the researcher's diary. Students also registered
their perceptions of the emotional climate of their classroom at
3-minute intervals using audience response technology. In this way,
emotional events were identified for video analysis. The findings of
this study highlighted that the activities pre-service teachers engaged
in matter to them. Positive emotional climate was identified in
activities involving students' presentations using video clips and
models, coteaching, and interactive whole class discussions. Decreases
in emotional climate were identified during formal lectures and when
unprepared presenters led presentations. Emotions such as frustration
and disappointment characterized classes with negative emotional
climate. The enabling conditions to sustain a positive emotional climate
are identified. Implications for sustaining macro-social policy about
Gross National Happiness are considered in light of the climate that
develops in science teacher education classes.

  Author Affiliation:

  (1) College of Education, Royal University of Bhutan, Samtse,
Bhutan

  (2) Murdoch University, Perth, Australia

  (3) Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

  Article History:

  Registration Date: 03/12/2014

  Received Date: 03/12/2014

  Accepted Date: 03/12/2014

  Online Date: 14/01/2016

  Article note:

  Lead editors: S. Ritchie and K. Tobin.

  This article is part of the Special Issue on Research on Emotions
of Science Education.

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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Comment to: Grass G, Dell'oro r, Quarti-Trevano F et al (2005) Neuroadrenergic and reflex abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome</title>
      <creator>Clark, MG</creator>
      <subject>Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Endocrinology</subject>
      <publisher>Springer-Verlag</publisher>
      <date>2005</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-005-0012-7</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0449669</relation>
      <relation>Clark, MG, Comment to: Grass G, Dell'oro r, Quarti-Trevano F et al (2005) Neuroadrenergic and reflex abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome, Diabetologia, 48, (12) pp. 2689-2690. ISSN 0012-186X (2005) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/37453</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-005-0012-7</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16270196</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2005</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="179334570" url="/work/179334570"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/179334570</troveUrl><title>Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with Osteoarthritis</title><contributor>Ding, C</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.027058266">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.3775</identifier><version id="195198804"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:84239</identifier>
    <datestamp>2014-05-23</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313130303030:313130333030:313130333232</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with Osteoarthritis</title>
      <creator>Ding, C</creator>
      <creator>Cicuttini, F</creator>
      <creator>Jones, G</creator>
      <subject>Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology and Arthritis</subject>
      <publisher>Amer Medical Assoc</publisher>
      <date>2013</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/84239/1/jlt120162_1583_1583-1.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.3775</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100276</relation>
      <relation>Ding, C and Cicuttini, F and Jones, G, Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with Osteoarthritis, Journal of The American Medical Association, 309, (15) pp. 1583-1584. ISSN 0098-7484 (2013) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/84239</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.3775</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23592096</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="197169600" url="/work/197169600"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/197169600</troveUrl><title>Evolution in the smallest valves (stomata) guides even the biggest trees</title><contributor>Brodribb, TJ</contributor><issued>2015</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.027058266">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/100414</identifier><version id="215916258"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:100414</identifier>
    <datestamp>2015-09-15</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D303630303030:303630373030:303630373035</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Evolution in the smallest valves (stomata) guides even the biggest trees</title>
      <creator>Brodribb, TJ</creator>
      <creator>McAdam, SAM</creator>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Plant Biology, Plant Physiology</subject>
      <publisher>Heron Publishing</publisher>
      <date>2015</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/100414/1/451 Brodribb.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpv042</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE140100946</relation>
      <relation>Brodribb, TJ and McAdam, SAM, Evolution in the smallest valves (stomata) guides even the biggest trees, Tree Physiology, 35, (5) pp. 451-452. ISSN 0829-318X (2015) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/100414</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpv042</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26041093</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="221115856" url="/work/221115856"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/221115856</troveUrl><title>Fire in Australia: how was the biota prepared for human occupation?</title><contributor>Hill, RS</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.027058266">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114729</identifier><version id="242545580"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:114729</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-02-28</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D303630303030:303630333030:303630333036</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Fire in Australia: how was the biota prepared for human occupation?</title>
      <creator>Hill, RS</creator>
      <creator>Jordan, GJ</creator>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change</subject>
      <publisher>CSIRO Publishing</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114729/1/Hill and Jordan How was the biota prepared for fire.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BTv64n8_ED1</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140100307</relation>
      <relation>Hill, RS and Jordan, GJ, Fire in Australia: how was the biota prepared for human occupation?, Australian Journal of Botany, 64, (7-8) pp. 555-556. ISSN 0067-1924 (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/114729</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BTv64n8_ED1</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="175029311" url="/work/175029311"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/175029311</troveUrl><title>More from the United States on patenting of biotechnology inventions and the potential impact on Australia</title><contributor>Nicol, D</contributor><issued>2012</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.024586823">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80872</identifier><version id="190689949"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:80872</identifier>
    <datestamp>2013-01-04</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313830303030:313830313030:313830313939</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>More from the United States on patenting of biotechnology inventions and the potential impact on Australia</title>
      <creator>Nicol, D</creator>
      <description>More from the United States on patenting of biotechnology inventions and the potential impact on Australia</description>
      <subject>Law and Legal Studies, Law, Law not elsewhere classified</subject>
      <publisher>LexisNexis</publisher>
      <date>2012</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80872/1/Nicol_MoreFromTheUS.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0985077</relation>
      <relation>Nicol, D, More from the United States on patenting of biotechnology inventions and the potential impact on Australia, Intellectual Property Law Bulletin, 24, (8) pp. 205-207. ISSN 1035-1353 (2012) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80872</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2012</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="217278967" url="/work/217278967"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/217278967</troveUrl><title>New applications of wastewater analyses for assessing substance use</title><contributor>Bruno, R</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.024586823">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/112899</identifier><version id="238412306"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:112899</identifier>
    <datestamp>2016-12-05</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313730303030:313739393030:313739393939</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>New applications of wastewater analyses for assessing substance use</title>
      <creator>Bruno, R</creator>
      <creator>Van Dyken, EL</creator>
      <creator>Prichard, J</creator>
      <subject>Psychology and Cognitive Sciences, Other Psychology and Cognitive Sciences, Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified</subject>
      <publisher>Carfax Publishing</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/112899/1/Bruno-2016-New applications of wastewater ana1.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12386</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP150100364</relation>
      <relation>Bruno, R and Van Dyken, EL and Prichard, J, New applications of wastewater analyses for assessing substance use, Drug and alcohol review, 35, (2) pp. 125-7. ISSN 0959-5236 (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/112899</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12386</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26947020</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="175029308" url="/work/175029308"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/175029308</troveUrl><title>Genetic land-grab or reward for ingenuity? Australian court to rule on gene patents</title><contributor>Nicol, D</contributor><issued>2012</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.022486674">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80869</identifier><version id="190689946"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:80869</identifier>
    <datestamp>2013-01-09</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313830303030:313830313030:313830313939</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Genetic land-grab or reward for ingenuity? Australian court to rule on gene patents</title>
      <creator>Nicol, D</creator>
      <description>IDEAS AND OWNERSHIP: The concept of protecting ideas and innovation by legal means dates back to antiquity. But in the age of the internet and multinational business models, many of the existing laws are under strain, their suitability and ultimate purpose called into question.Here, Dianne Nicol examines a court case that will decide whether human genes are patentable subject matter in Australia.</description>
      <subject>Law and Legal Studies, Law, Law not elsewhere classified</subject>
      <publisher>The Conversation Media Group</publisher>
      <date>2012</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80869/1/Nicol_GeneticLandGrab.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0985077</relation>
      <relation>Nicol, D, Genetic land-grab or reward for ingenuity? Australian court to rule on gene patents, The Conversation pp. 1-3. ISSN 2201-5639 (2012) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80869</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2012</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="175029309" url="/work/175029309"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/175029309</troveUrl><title>Do patents promote innovation?</title><contributor>Nicol, D</contributor><issued>2012</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.022486674">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80870</identifier><version id="190689947"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:80870</identifier>
    <datestamp>2013-01-09</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313830303030:313830313030:313830313939</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Do patents promote innovation?</title>
      <creator>Nicol, D</creator>
      <creator>Liddicoat, JE</creator>
      <description>IDEAS AND OWNERSHIP: The concept of protecting ideas and innovation by legal means dates back to antiquity. But in the age of the internet and multinational business models, many of the existing laws are under strain, their suitability and ultimate purpose called into question.Here, Dianne Nicol and John Liddicoat delve into the issue of whether the patent system, as it stands, really promotes ideas and innovation, as is regularly claimed.</description>
      <subject>Law and Legal Studies, Law, Law not elsewhere classified</subject>
      <publisher>The Conversation Media Group</publisher>
      <date>2012</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80870/1/Nicol_DoPatentsPromoteInnovation.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0985077</relation>
      <relation>Nicol, D and Liddicoat, JE, Do patents promote innovation?, The Conversation pp. 1-3. ISSN 2201-5639 (2012) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/80870</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2012</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="224309828" url="/work/224309828"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/224309828</troveUrl><title>Determining scientific projects for the deep-sea drilling vessel <i>Chikyu</i></title><contributor>Coffin, MF</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.022486674">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/116442</identifier><version id="246069929"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:116442</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-05-10</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D303430303030:303430333030:303430333035</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Determining scientific projects for the deep-sea drilling vessel <i>Chikyu</i></title>
      <creator>Coffin, MF</creator>
      <creator>Given, HK</creator>
      <creator>Eguchi, N</creator>
      <description>An international, multidisciplinary communityworkshop convened to define scientificprojects for the next decade of scientificocean drilling utilizing unique capabilitiesafforded by the drilling vessel Chikyu (Earthin Japanese). The meeting, attended by397 participants from 21 countries, featured10 keynote lectures. Participants in workinggroups identified important projects that arefundamental to understanding the Earth systemand that require deep penetration of theseafloor.</description>
      <subject>Earth Sciences, Geology, Marine Geoscience</subject>
      <publisher>American Geophysical Union</publisher>
      <date>2013</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/116442/1/Coffin_et_al_Eos_2013.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LE140100047</relation>
      <relation>Coffin, MF and Given, HK and Eguchi, N, Determining scientific projects for the deep-sea drilling vessel <i>Chikyu</i>, Eos, 94, (29) pp. 256. ISSN 0096-3941 (2013) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/116442</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="213603842" url="/work/213603842"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/213603842</troveUrl><title>Streamlining ethical review of data intensive research: Unfounded concerns about local liability should not delay urgent reform</title><contributor>Townend, D</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.022486674">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet>Streamlining ethical review of data intensive <b>research</b>: Unfounded concerns about local liability</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111514</identifier><version id="234522552"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:111514</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-12-14</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D313830303030:313830313030:313830313939</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Streamlining ethical review of data intensive research: Unfounded concerns about local liability should not delay urgent reform</title>
      <creator>Townend, D</creator>
      <creator>Dove, ES</creator>
      <creator>Nicol, D</creator>
      <creator>Bovenberg, J</creator>
      <creator>Knoppers, BM</creator>
      <description>Unfounded concerns about local liability should not delay urgent reform. </description>
      <subject>Law and Legal Studies, Law, Law not elsewhere classified</subject>
      <publisher>BMJ Publishing Group</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111514/1/bmj.i4181.full.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i4181</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140100301</relation>
      <relation>Townend, D and Dove, ES and Nicol, D and Bovenberg, J and Knoppers, BM, Streamlining ethical review of data intensive research: Unfounded concerns about local liability should not delay urgent reform, British Medical Journal, 354 Article i4181. ISSN 0959-535X (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111514</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i4181</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27486077</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="209198856" url="/work/209198856"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/209198856</troveUrl><title>Interactions between brassinosteroids and gibberellins: synthesis or signaling?</title><contributor>Ross, JJ</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.019150801">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.15.00917</identifier><version id="229522563"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:109433</identifier>
    <datestamp>2016-06-16</datestamp>
    <setSpec>63617465676F72793D4134</setSpec>
    <setSpec>7375626A6563743D303630303030:303630373030:303630373035</setSpec>
  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Interactions between brassinosteroids and gibberellins: synthesis or signaling?</title>
      <creator>Ross, JJ</creator>
      <creator>Quittenden, LJ</creator>
      <description>Plants contain three major growth-promotingplant hormones: auxin, gibberellins (GAs),and brassinosteroids (BRs), although otherhormones also promote growth in certaincircumstances. Possible interactions betweenthe major three growth hormoneshave received much attention over the decades.In 2012, three articles proposed thatthe BRs and GAs can interact at the signalinglevel (Bai et al., 2012; Gallego-Bartolomeet al., 2012; Li et al., 2012), and since then,this has become an accepted model (Figure1; Oh et al., 2014; Wang et al., 2014; Davie'reand Achard, 2016). This signaling modelposits that DELLA proteins, which are negativeregulators of GA signaling that aredegraded by bioactive GA, physically interactwith positive regulators of the BR response,BZR1 proteins (Bai et al., 2012; Gallego-Bartolome et al., 2012; Li et al., 2012). TheDELLA-BZR1 interaction interferes with thefunction of BZR1 proteins, thereby reducinggrowth.</description>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Plant Biology, Plant Physiology</subject>
      <publisher>Amer Soc Plant Biologists</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/109433/1/Ross and Quittenden 2016.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.15.00917</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP130103357</relation>
      <relation>Ross, JJ and Quittenden, LJ, Interactions between brassinosteroids and gibberellins: synthesis or signaling?, Plant Cell, 28, (4) pp. 829-832. ISSN 1040-4651 (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/109433</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.15.00917</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="228245642" url="/work/228245642"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/228245642</troveUrl><title>Marine protected areas need accountability not wasted dollars</title><contributor>Edgar, GJ</contributor><issued>2017</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.019150801">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/120483</identifier><version id="250544309"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:120483</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-08-29</datestamp>
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  </header><metadata>
    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Marine protected areas need accountability not wasted dollars</title>
      <creator>Edgar, GJ</creator>
      <description>In this era of fiscal constraint following the globalfinancial crisis, marine protected areas (MPAs)occupy a remarkable position in the economiclandscape. Few government authorities seemconcerned about the prevalence of white elephants illusionary MPAs that carry a financial cost.Whereas no government minister would considerdeveloping a health system based solely onnumber of hospital beds (irrespective of whetherall hospitals are concentrated within a single city,or occupants of beds have access to medical staff,or patients are living or dying), MPAs are largelyassessed on a single numerical target (total area).Inconsistent self-identification adds an extra levelof opaqueness. The net consequence is anunaccountable and under-performing system, anoutcome that is both tragic and economicallywasteful.</description>
      <subject>Biological Sciences, Ecology, Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)</subject>
      <publisher>John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</publisher>
      <date>2017</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/120483/1/Edgar 2017 MPA accountability.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2745</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP150100761</relation>
      <relation>Edgar, GJ, Marine protected areas need accountability not wasted dollars, Aquatic Conservation, 27 pp. 4-9. ISSN 1099-0755 (2017) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/120483</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2745</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2017</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="189956745" url="/work/189956745"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/189956745</troveUrl><title>Protecting islands from pest invasion: Response to Greenslade et al</title><contributor>Moore, JL</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.017915081">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2012.08.036</identifier><version id="206717607"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:89239</identifier>
    <datestamp>2014-02-28</datestamp>
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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Protecting islands from pest invasion: Response to Greenslade et al</title>
      <creator>Moore, JL</creator>
      <creator>Rout, TM</creator>
      <creator>Hauser, CE</creator>
      <creator>Moro, D</creator>
      <creator>Jones, M</creator>
      <creator>Wilcox, C</creator>
      <creator>Possingham, HP</creator>
      <description>Letter to the Editor: Decision models are becoming widespread in environmental management. They aid decision makers by enabling them to identify trade-offs and assumptions in the framing of problems  they do not make decisions. We presented a framework to examine allocation of resources between quarantine and surveillance, using Black rat invasion data on Barrow Island for illustration (Moore et al., 2010). In keeping with the philosophy of decision models as tools, we did not recommend resource allocation strategies on Barrow Island. Rather we demonstrated a rigorous approach to resource allocation, explored issues associated with management and identified areas for future work.</description>
      <subject>Environmental Sciences, Environmental Science and Management, Conservation and Biodiversity</subject>
      <publisher>Elsevier Sci Ltd</publisher>
      <date>2013</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/89239/1/Moore et al 2013 Biol Cons Protecting islands from pest invasion - response to Greenslade et al.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2012.08.036</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100250</relation>
      <relation>Moore, JL and Rout, TM and Hauser, CE and Moro, D and Jones, M and Wilcox, C and Possingham, HP, Protecting islands from pest invasion: Response to Greenslade et al, Biological Conservation, 157 pp. 435-436. ISSN 0006-3207 (2013) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/89239</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2012.08.036</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="213114091" url="/work/213114091"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/213114091</troveUrl><title>Big Data and Australian history</title><contributor>Maxwell-Stewart, H</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.017915081">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet> to sources of informationthat are so large and complex that they defy traditional means ofprocessing and handling, much <b>research</b></snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111474</identifier><version id="234005850"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:111474</identifier>
    <datestamp>2017-09-06</datestamp>
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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Big Data and Australian history</title>
      <creator>Maxwell-Stewart, H</creator>
      <description>Big History is a term that has particular resonance for historians of Australia  acontinent with a 60,000-year record of human occupation and a geologicalhistory that extends a further 3,070 million years. Recently historians havealso begun to engage with the concept of big data. It is not surprising that thesetwo terms are often linked. Any attempt to unite natural and human history ina single, grand and intelligible narrative will necessarily result in the engagementwith a lot of data. While few historians have access to sources of informationthat are so large and complex that they defy traditional means ofprocessing and handling, much research that engages with what might genuinelybe described as big data has a historical dimension. Climate science, analysis ofcriminal justice statistics and life course and intergenerational health researchare all good examples. This forum in Australian Historical Studies on big data isthus most timely. It explores some of the ways that the increased availability ofdigital data is impacting on Australian historical research and focuses on digitalresearch that connects Australias history to wider international and transnationaldevelopments.</description>
      <subject>History and Archaeology, Historical Studies, Australian History (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)</subject>
      <publisher>Routledge</publisher>
      <date>2016</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111474/2/111474 - Big Data and Australian history.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1031461X.2016.1208728</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140102231</relation>
      <relation>Maxwell-Stewart, H, Big Data and Australian history, Australian Historical Studies, 47, (3) pp. 359-364. ISSN 1031-461X (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/111474</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1031461X.2016.1208728</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2016</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="192466993" url="/work/192466993"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/192466993</troveUrl><title>Response to commentary by Woinarski (Critical-weight-range marsupials in northern Australia are declining: a commentary on Fisher <i>et al</i>. (2014)  The current decline of tropical marsupials in Australia: is history repeating?')</title><contributor>Fisher, DO</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Unpublished</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.014579209">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12252</identifier><version id="210478781"><record><header>
    <identifier>oai:ecite.utas.edu.au:97575</identifier>
    <datestamp>2015-01-30</datestamp>
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    <dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
      <title>Response to commentary by Woinarski (Critical-weight-range marsupials in northern Australia are declining: a commentary on Fisher <i>et al</i>. (2014)  The current decline of tropical marsupials in Australia: is history repeating?')</title>
      <creator>Fisher, DO</creator>
      <creator>Johnson, CN</creator>
      <creator>Lawes, MJ</creator>
      <creator>Fritz, SA</creator>
      <creator>McCallum, H</creator>
      <creator>Blomberg, SP</creator>
      <creator>VanDerWal, J</creator>
      <creator>Abbott, B</creator>
      <creator>Frank, A</creator>
      <creator>Legge, S</creator>
      <creator>Letnic, M</creator>
      <creator>Thomas, CR</creator>
      <creator>Fisher, A</creator>
      <creator>Gordon, IJ</creator>
      <creator>Kutt, A</creator>
      <description>The recent commentary by Woinarski (2014, <em>Global Ecology and Biogeography</em>, doi: 10.1111/geb.12165) disagreed with our conclusions on the correlates of decline in the marsupials of tropical Australia (Fisher et&#8201;al., 2014, <em>Global Ecology and Biogeography</em>, <b>23</b>, 181190). We compared traits of species that were associated with range decline in southern and northern Australia. We found that habitat structure, climate and body size were correlated with range decline. In the north, declines of marsupials were most severe in savanna with moderate rainfall. In the south, the ranges of species in open habitat with very low rainfall have declined most. Also, the association between range decline and body mass differed between north and south: this is the main concern of Woinarski, who further disagreed with our choice of the Tropic of Capricorn as a boundary between north and south, our omission of rodents, how to treat timing of extinctions, and our inference that cats are major drivers of decline. We address these concerns in this response.</description>
      <subject>Environmental Sciences, Environmental Science and Management, Wildlife and Habitat Management</subject>
      <publisher>Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.</publisher>
      <date>2014</date>
      <type>letter</type>
      
      <language>en</language>
      <format>application/pdf</format>
      <relation>http://ecite.utas.edu.au/97575/1/fisher et al 2014b.pdf</relation>
      <relation>http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12252</relation>
      <relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP100100033</relation>
      <relation>Fisher, DO and Johnson, CN and Lawes, MJ and Fritz, SA and McCallum, H and Blomberg, SP and VanDerWal, J and Abbott, B and Frank, A and Legge, S and Letnic, M and Thomas, CR and Fisher, A and Gordon, IJ and Kutt, A, Response to commentary by Woinarski (Critical-weight-range marsupials in northern Australia are declining: a commentary on Fisher <i>et al</i>. (2014)  The current decline of tropical marsupials in Australia: is history repeating?'), Global Ecology and Biogeography, 24, (1) pp. 123-125. ISSN 1466-822X (2014) [Letter or Note in Journal]</relation>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://ecite.utas.edu.au/97575</identifier>
      <identifier linktype="unknown">http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12252</identifier>
    </dc>
  </metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">TU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Unpublished</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work></records></zone><zone name="book"><records s="0" n="20" total="1197" next="/result?q=%22http%3A%2F%2Fpurl.org%2Fau-research%2Fgrants%2FARC%22&include=workversions&zone=book&s=20"><work id="197893309" url="/work/197893309"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/197893309</troveUrl><title>Research, records and responsibility: ten years of PARADISEC</title><issued>2015</issued><type>Book</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.070726514">vaguely relevant</relevance><snippet><b>Research</b>, records and responsibility: ten years of PARADISEC </snippet><version id="226564247"><record><header><identifier>oai:minerva-access.unimelb.edu.au:11343/55706</identifier><datestamp>2017-10-05T17:11:01Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_11343_391</setSpec><setSpec>com_11343_384</setSpec><setSpec>com_11343_159</setSpec><setSpec>col_11343_392</setSpec></header><metadata><qualifieddc schemaLocation="http://purl.org/dc/terms/ http://dublincore.org/schemas/xmls/qdc/2006/01/06/dcterms.xsd http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/ http://dublincore.org/schemas/xmls/qdc/2006/01/06/dc.xsd"><title>Research, records and responsibility: ten years of PARADISEC</title><creator>__________</creator><dateAccepted>2015-09-29T20:24:23Z</dateAccepted><available>2015-09-29T20:24:23Z</available><created>2015-09-29T20:24:23Z</created><issued>2015</issued><type>book</type><publisher>Sydney University Press</publisher><relation>
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                    http://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/SR0566965</relation><relation>
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                    http://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/DP0984419</relation><relation>
                    http://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/CE140100041</relation><bibliographicCitation type="isbn">9781743324431</bibliographicCitation><bibliographicCitation type="yearIssued">2015</bibliographicCitation><identifier type="dcterms:URI" linktype="notonline">http://hdl.handle.net/11343/55706</identifier></qualifieddc></metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">VU:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="208612655" url="/work/208612655"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/208612655</troveUrl><title>Defragging subgraph features for graph classification</title><contributor>Wang, H</contributor><issued>2015</issued><type>Conference Proceedings</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.0670321">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43958</identifier><version id="228907383"><record><header><identifier>oai:opus.lib.uts.edu.au:10453/43958</identifier><datestamp>2018-08-13T19:15:39Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_10453_35199</setSpec><setSpec>col_10453_35203</setSpec></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>Defragging subgraph features for graph classification</title>
<creator>Wang, H</creator>
<creator>Zhang, P</creator>
<creator>Tsang, I</creator>
<creator>Chen, L</creator>
<creator>Zhang, C</creator>
<description>© 2015 ACM. Graph classification is an important tool for analysing structured and semi-structured data, where subgraphs are commonly used as the feature representation. However, the number and size of subgraph features crucially depend on the threshold parameters of frequent subgraph mining algorithms. Any improper setting of the parameters will generate many trivial short-pattern subgraph fragments which dominate the feature space, distort graph classifiers and bury interesting long-pattern subgraphs. In this paper, we propose a new Subgraph Join Feature Selection (SJFS) algorithm. The SJFS algorithm, by forcing graph classifiers to join short-pattern subgraph fragments, can defrag trivial subgraph features and deliver long-pattern interesting subgraphs. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world social network graph data demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.</description>
<date>2015-10-17</date>
<type>Conference Proceeding</type>
<identifier>International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings, 2015, 19-23-Oct-2015 pp. 1687 - 1690</identifier>
<identifier>9781450337946</identifier>
<identifier linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43958</identifier>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0449535</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0667060</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0775041R1</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0988016</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0989721R1</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT0990811</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1093762</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP100200774</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT11</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT11</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP120100566</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140102206</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LE140100061</relation>
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<relation>International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings</relation>
<relation>10.1145/2806416.2806585</relation><relation>http://doi.org/10.1145/2806416.2806585</relation>
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</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NTSM:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Conference Proceedings</type><issued>2015-10-17</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="230601067" url="/work/230601067"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/230601067</troveUrl><title>Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Methods for Electrical Machines and Drive Systems</title><contributor>Lei, G</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Book</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.05478452">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/122994</identifier><version id="254072021"><record><header><identifier>oai:opus.lib.uts.edu.au:10453/122994</identifier><datestamp>2018-08-13T18:30:00Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_10453_30053</setSpec><setSpec>com_10453_35431</setSpec><setSpec>col_10453_30054</setSpec></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Methods for Electrical Machines and Drive Systems</title>
<creator>Lei, G</creator>
<creator>Zhu, J</creator>
<creator>Guo, Y</creator>
<date>2016-01-01</date>
<type>book</type>
<identifier>2016, pp. 1 - 241 (241)</identifier>
<identifier>978-3-662-49269-7</identifier>
<identifier linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/122994</identifier>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0454306R1</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0773858</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP120104305</relation>
<relation>Power Systems</relation>
<relation>10.1007/978-3-662-49271-0</relation><relation>http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-49271-0</relation>
<publisher>SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN</publisher>
</dc>
</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NTSM:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Book</type><issued>2016-01-01</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="221821587" url="/work/221821587"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/221821587</troveUrl><title>High frequency trading and learning in a dynamic limit order market</title><contributor>Arifovic, J</contributor><issued>2016</issued><type>Conference Proceedings</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.054166645">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/85524</identifier><version id="243282626"><record><header><identifier>oai:opus.lib.uts.edu.au:10453/85524</identifier><datestamp>2018-08-13T18:30:48Z</datestamp><setSpec>com_10453_35188</setSpec><setSpec>col_10453_35363</setSpec></header><metadata><dc schemaLocation="http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc/ http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/2.0/oai_dc.xsd">
<title>High frequency trading and learning in a dynamic limit order market</title>
<creator>Arifovic, J</creator>
<creator>Chiarella, C</creator>
<creator>He, X</creator>
<creator>Wei, L</creator>
<date>2016-06-26</date>
<date>2016-06-26</date>
<type>Conference Proceeding</type>
<identifier>2016</identifier>
<identifier linktype="unknown">http://hdl.handle.net/10453/85524</identifier>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110104487</relation>
<relation>http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP130103210</relation>
<relation>International Conference on Computing in Economics and Finance</relation>
</dc>
</metadata><metadataSource type="nuc">NTSM:IR</metadataSource></record><type>Conference Proceedings</type><issued>2016-06-26</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="230172739" url="/work/230172739"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/230172739</troveUrl><title>Survivorship: A Sociology of Cancer in Everyday Life</title><contributor>Broom, A</contributor><issued>2019</issued><type>Book</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="0.050671495">vaguely relevant</relevance><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext">http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/unsworks_49724</identifier><version id="253410864"><record><header>

      <identifier>oai:unsworks.library.unsw.edu.au:1959.4/unsworks_49724</identifier>

      <datestamp>2018-03-13T17:16:56Z</datestamp>

	  </header><metadata>

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   <type>text</type>
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   <title>Survivorship: A Sociology of Cancer in Everyday Life</title>
   <creator>Broom, A</creator>
   <date>2019</date>
   <publisher>Routledge</publisher>
   <publisher>London and New York</publisher>
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<description>Within Human-Computer Interaction and Internet Studies there is a growing interest in non-users, which articulates the increasingly diverse modes of digital media engagement that slip between established categories of user/non-user, online/offline and self/other. In this paper we aim to build on these concerns and their disciplinary intersections to map emerging forms of computer interaction and social media participation that can be grouped together under the concept of proxy users-intermediaries that act on behalf of others. This preliminary mapping work, surveying a number of research projects and studies involving the authors, begins to trace the diversity of agents, roles, contexts, and motivations of proxy users.</description>
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<source>Being Human, Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (OzCHI 15), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 7-10 December, 2015, pp. 294-298</source>
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Access open for <b>research</b>, personal copies and public use. </snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212121973</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212121973-t</identifier><version id="210603143"><record><title>Rosemary Kayess interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Kayess, Rosemary, 1963-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Rubenstein, Kim,</creator><issued>2015</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">900652155</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000054011704</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="192864833" url="/work/192864833"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/192864833</troveUrl><title>Koula Kossiavelos interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Kossiavelos, Koula, 1960-</contributor><issued>2015</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5434976">very relevant</relevance><version id="211110957"><record><title>Koula Kossiavelos interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Kossiavelos, Koula, 1960-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2015</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000054422185</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">904798492</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="150970048" url="/work/150970048"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/150970048</troveUrl><title>Jane Mathews interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><contributor>Mathews, Jane (Jane Hamilton)</contributor><issued>2011</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><snippet>Digital master available ; National Library of Australia ; nla.obj-219652265. Access open for <b>research</b></snippet><version id="164589627"><record><title>Jane Mathews interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Mathews, Jane (Jane Hamilton)</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2011</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">721291243</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000046946980</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191199740" url="/work/191199740"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191199740</troveUrl><title>Susan Kenny interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Kenny, Susan, 1953-</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><version id="208571626"><record><title>Susan Kenny interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Kenny, Susan, 1953-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052963983</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">881471272</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="187500821" url="/work/187500821"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/187500821</troveUrl><title>Patricia Conroy interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Conroy, Patricia, 1936-</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><snippet>, husband of Patricia Conroy, is also present. Written permission required for <b>research</b>, personal copies</snippet><version id="204074684"><record><title>Patricia Conroy interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Conroy, Patricia, 1936-</creator><creator type="(Interviewee)">Conroy, Martin.</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Henningham, Nicola, 1960-</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">864127548</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052243023</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191223349" url="/work/191223349"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191223349</troveUrl><title>Margaret Thornton interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Thornton, Margaret (Margaret Rose), 1940-</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><version id="208639157"><record><title>Margaret Thornton interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Thornton, Margaret (Margaret Rose), 1940-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Rubenstein, Kim,</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">881681509</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052970553</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="191773499" url="/work/191773499"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/191773499</troveUrl><title>Irene Watson interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Watson, Irene</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><version id="209509994"><record><title>Irene Watson interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Watson, Irene,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Henningham, Nicola, 1960-,</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000053591300</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">893526100</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="192034263" url="/work/192034263"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/192034263</troveUrl><title>Margaret Nyland interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Nyland, Margaret, 1942-</contributor><issued>2014</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><version id="209894561"><record><title>Margaret Nyland interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Nyland, Margaret, 1942-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000053739144</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">894480445</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="192864831" url="/work/192864831"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/192864831</troveUrl><title>Catherine Branson interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Branson, Catherine, 1948-</contributor><issued>2014-2015</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5413973">very relevant</relevance><snippet> project. Timed summary available and 273 page uncorrected transcript Access open for <b>research</b>, personal</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digital collection item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212120206</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212120206-t</identifier><version id="211110955"><record><title>Catherine Branson interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Branson, Catherine, 1948-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Rubenstein, Kim,</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">904798327</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000054422183</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014-2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="192554473" url="/work/192554473"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/192554473</troveUrl><title>Hilary Penfold interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Penfold, Hilary, 1953-</contributor><issued>2014-2015</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5376902">very relevant</relevance><snippet>. Written permission required for <b>research</b>, personal copies and public use. </snippet><version id="210603139"><record><title>Hilary Penfold interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Penfold, Hilary, 1953-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2014</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000054011700</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">900652138</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2014-2015</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="156083755" url="/work/156083755"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/156083755</troveUrl><title>Mary Hiscock interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><contributor>Hiscock, Mary E. (Mary Elizabeth), 1939-</contributor><issued>2011</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5297828">very relevant</relevance><version id="170151595"><record><title>Mary Hiscock interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Hiscock, Mary E. (Mary Elizabeth), 1939-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2011</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000047683648</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">749445777</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="183299346" url="/work/183299346"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/183299346</troveUrl><title>Patti Chong interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Chong, Patti, 1955-</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5288785">very relevant</relevance><snippet> project. Timed summary (8 pages) and uncorrected transcript (typescript, 171 leaves) Access open for <b>research</b></snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212078967</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212078967-t</identifier><version id="199672632"><record><title>Patti Chong interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Chong, Patti, 1955-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Henningham, Nicola, 1960-</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000051816223</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">855286201</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="183299347" url="/work/183299347"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/183299347</troveUrl><title>Jenni Hill interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Hill, Jenni, 1968-</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5288785">very relevant</relevance><snippet> project. Summary not yet available. Uncorrected transcript (typescript, 110 leaves) available Access open for <b>research</b></snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212080832</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-212080832-t</identifier><version id="199672633"><record><title>Jenni Hill interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Hill, Jenni, 1968-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Henningham, Nicola, 1960-,</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">855286202</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000051816224</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="37954372" url="/work/37954372"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37954372</troveUrl><title>Eve Mahlab interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><contributor>Mahlab, Eve, 1937-</contributor><issued>2010</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.5140333">very relevant</relevance><snippet>). Access open for <b>research</b>, personal copies and public use. Timed summary (10 p.) and corrected transcript</snippet><identifier type="url" linktype="fulltext" linktext="National Library of Australia digitised item">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-219649489</identifier><identifier type="url" linktype="thumbnail">http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-219649489-t</identifier><version id="50143589"><record><title>Eve Mahlab interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Mahlab, Eve, 1937-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2010</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000045999545</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2010</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="150970049" url="/work/150970049"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/150970049</troveUrl><title>Rebecca Irwin interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><contributor>Irwin, Rebecca, 197-</contributor><issued>2011</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.1843777">very relevant</relevance><version id="164589628"><record><title>Rebecca Irwin interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law pilot oral history project</title><creator type="(Interviewee)">Irwin, Rebecca, 197-</creator><creator type="(Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim.</creator><issued>2011</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">721289042</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000046946981</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2011</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="178953756" url="/work/178953756"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/178953756</troveUrl><title>Katy Le Roy interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Le Roy, Katy, 1974-</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.1843777">very relevant</relevance><version id="194804661"><record><title>Katy Le Roy interviewed by Kim Rubenstein in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.) (Interviewee)">Le Roy, Katy, 1974-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.) (Interviewer)">Rubenstein, Kim,</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000050829214</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">840484546</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work><work id="186837058" url="/work/186837058"><troveUrl>http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/186837058</troveUrl><title>Jocelynne Scutt interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project</title><contributor>Scutt, Jocelynne A., Dr, 1947-</contributor><issued>2013</issued><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><type>Sound</type><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount><versionCount>1</versionCount><relevance score="2.1843777">very relevant</relevance><version id="203385428"><record><title>Jocelynne Scutt interviewed by Nikki Henningham in the Trailblazing women and the law oral history project.</title><creator type="(interviewee.)">Scutt, Jocelynne A., Dr, 1947-,</creator><creator type="(interviewer.)">Henningham, Nicola, 1960-,</creator><issued>2013</issued><identifier type="control number" source="OCoLC">862379083</identifier><identifier type="control number" source="AuCNLKIN">000052170123</identifier><metadataSource>Libraries Australia</metadataSource></record><type>Sound</type><type>Sound/Interview, lecture, talk</type><issued>2013</issued><holdingsCount>1</holdingsCount></version></work></records></zone></response>
        

Examples

Click on any of the examples below to open them in this console. If you want to use them in your own code you'll need to get an API key and add '&key=[Your API key]' to the url.

See the Trove API documentation for a full list of available parameters and detailed information on constructing queries.

Search everything

Parameters url
  • zone: all
  • q (query): wragge
  • encoding: xml (default)
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge&zone=all
  • zone: all
  • q (query): wragge
  • encoding: json
  • n (number of results): 50
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge&zone=all&encoding=json&n=50
  • zone: all
  • q (query): nuc:ANL (contributor id)
  • encoding: json
  • n (number of results): 50
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=nuc:ANL&zone=all&encoding=json
  • zone: all
  • q (query): wragge
  • encoding: json
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
  • l-australian: y (in Australia or by Australians)
  • l-availability: y/f (freely accessible online)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge&zone=all&encoding=json&l-australia=y&l-availability=y/f

Search newspapers

Parameters url
  • zone: newspaper
  • q (query): wragge AND weather
  • encoding: json
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge+AND+weather&zone=newspaper&encoding=json
  • zone: newspaper
  • q (query): wragge AND weather
  • encoding: json
  • l-year: 1903
  • l-category: Article
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge AND weather&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-year=1903
  • zone: newspaper
  • q (query): wragge AND weather
  • encoding: json
  • l-decade: 190
  • facet: year
  • n (number of results): 0
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge AND weather&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-decade=190&facet=year&n=0

Search other zones

Parameters url
  • zone: book,picture
  • q (query): wragge AND weather
  • encoding: json
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=wragge AND weather&zone=book,picture&encoding=json
  • zone: book
  • q (query): weather
  • encoding: json
  • l-format: Thesis
  • n (number of results): 20 (default)
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=weather&zone=book&encoding=json&l-format=Thesis
  • zone: book
  • q (query): weather
  • encoding: json
  • facet: format
  • n (number of results): 0
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=weather&zone=book&encoding=json&facet=format&n=0
  • zone: list
  • q (query): war memorials
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=war memorials&zone=list&encoding=json

Get record

Parameters url
  • type: newspaper
  • article id: 41697877
  • reclevel: full
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/41697877?encoding=json&reclevel=full
  • type: newspaper
  • article id: 146871507
  • reclevel: full
  • include: articletext
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/41697877?reclevel=full&include=articletext
  • type: work
  • article id: 36904481
  • reclevel: full
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/work/36904481?encoding=json&reclevel=full
  • type: work
  • article id: 34769014
  • reclevel: full
  • include: workVersions,holdings
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/work/34769014?encoding=json&include=workVersions,holdings&reclevel=full
  • type: list
  • list id: 1442
  • reclevel: full
  • include: listItems
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/list/1442?encoding=json&reclevel=full&include=listItems

List/get newspaper titles

Parameters url
  • state: vic
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/titles?state=vic
  • title id: 35
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/title/35?encoding=json
  • title id: 35
  • include: years
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/title/35?encoding=json&include=years

List/get Trove contributors

Parameters url
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/contributor?encoding=json
  • NUC identifier: ANL
  • reclevel: full
  • encoding: json
http://api.trove.nla.gov.au/contributor/ANL?encoding=json&reclevel=full