Trove API Console

Explore the workings of the Trove API

Enter an API query to view the results (no key required), or start with one of the examples below.

Clear


          {"response":{"query":"wragge","zone":[{"name":"newspaper","records":{"s":"*","n":"20","total":"136836","next":"\/result?q=wragge&encoding=json&include=articletext&zone=newspaper&s=AoIIQ3DMjSkxNzEyNzk0MzE%3D","nextStart":"AoIIQ3DMjSkxNzEyNzk0MzE=","article":[{"id":"61389505","url":"\/newspaper\/61389505","heading":"MR. WRAGGE'S \"WRAGGE.\"","category":"Article","title":{"id":"64","value":"Clarence and Richmond Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1889 - 1915)"},"date":"1902-07-15","page":4,"pageSequence":4,"relevance":{"score":"279.41724","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr. Wragge is going to issue a \"Wragge.\" This is the title of his paper to be, as Mr. Wragge, having weathered Sproule, Drake and other extraordinarily named storms on","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/61389505?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  MR.  WRAGGE'S  \"WRAGGE.\"   <\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Mr.  Wragge  is  going  to  issue  a  \"Wragge.\"   <\/span><span>  This  is  the  title  of  his  paper  to  be,  as  Mr.   <\/span><span>  Wragge,  having  weathered  Sproule,  Drake   <\/span><span>  and  other  extraordinarily  named  storms  on   <\/span><span>  the  coast,  is  going  to  trust  to  the  sea  of   <\/span><span>  journalism  and  seek  to  weather  the  storms   <\/span><span>  there.  Hence,  the  tables  are  somewhat   <\/span><span>  turned,  as  the  people  who  belong  to  that  ;<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  craft  now  can  issue  a  forecast  themselves  :-   <\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Dirty  weather  in  the  composing  room.  A   <\/span><span>  breeze  between  Foreman  and  Machinist.<\/span><span>  Squalls  with  \"Devil\"  much  in  evidence,<\/span><span>  and  Editor  reminded  that  his  villainously<\/span><span>  bad  hand-writing  puts  up  expenses  twenty<\/span><span>  per  cent.  Contributors  warned  to  keep  off<\/span><span>  the  step.  Note-Much  upset  by  the  delay<\/span><span>  of  the  Department  in  delivering  wire<\/span><span>  relating  to  pugilistic  encounter  between<\/span><span>  Boreas  and  Father  Neptune.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  To  be  serious,  why  \"  Wragge,\"  and  where<\/span><span>  the  room  for  a  newspaper  dealing  with  such<\/span><span>  a  dry  subject  as  weather?  Is  the  \"  Wragge\"<\/span><span>  out  ;  give  me  a  copy  of  the  \"  Wragge  ;\"  just<\/span><span>  off  the  press-a  wet  Wragge,  etc.-  -are  terms<\/span><span>  which  will  become  popular  among  the  jokers<\/span><span>  who  have  nothing  more  to  do  than  dissect<\/span><span>  their  neighbors'  names.  Also,  they  are  likely<\/span><span>  to  be  about  the  only  thing  connected  with<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Wraggé's  \"Wragge\"  that  will  last.      <\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"217926119","url":"\/newspaper\/217926119","heading":"'Wragge' on Wragge.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"902","value":"Glen Innes Examiner and General Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1908)"},"date":"1902-12-12","page":6,"pageSequence":6,"relevance":{"score":"277.30228","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"IN his weekly paper 'Wragge,' Mr. Clement Wragge on Thursday last prints the following, saying he gives it without any comment whatever: \"The Australian drought exists because this world","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/217926119?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  '.Wratr  go'  on  Wraggo.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  '  lNr  his,  weokly  papcr  VWraggo,.  Mr.  Clcniont<\/span><span>  Wraggo  on  Thursday  luetprints  tho  following,'  say-  -<\/span><span>  ing  ho  -gives  it:  witliout  any'.comtnent  Whatovor  :<\/span><span>  u  The  Australian  drought  oxist'3  bccausotliis  world:<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  is,  cut-off'  fronr  the  heavenly'  planets1  by  a  strong,<\/span><span>  :  .force.:  In  thohtni03phero  thoro  is,  -Bri  to  apeak,  a'<\/span><span>  war  rainong  tho  cfomorite  j  the  :carth;muat;suffer.<\/span><span>  Thqeo'disturbarices  will  not  :  take  placo  again  for<\/span><span>  many  y  ears.  -  -  'A  bo  vo  your  beads  tlio  planets  hri?  all<\/span><span>  undergoihgia  great  ohqngo.  -  This  stato  has  been<\/span><span>  islowly  but'  surely  tconiing  on  -  this  ,  planot  \"  called<\/span><span>  earth,;  and  slowly  .but  surely  .it  is  '  passing  away.  .<\/span><span>  rAftor  this  year  the  lioavons'shall  bo  open  and  tlieri<\/span><span>  this'  planet  shall  receivo  heavy  rains  and  likely<\/span><span>  floods.  TSigne'd)-Profodsbb  K;!!  h\/i  .  V<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"135348864","url":"\/newspaper\/135348864","heading":"WRAGGE.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"356","value":"Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954)"},"date":"1902-04-10","page":4,"pageSequence":4,"relevance":{"score":"266.83356","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr. Clement L. Wragge, the far famed weather prophet is on a visit to Newcastle, and will lecture to-night and to-morrow in the Victoria Theatre. No man","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/135348864?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WA-  GWEAsre..<\/span><span>  Mr.  Clement  L.  Wragge.  the  far-famed<\/span><span>  weathcr  prophet  is  en  a  visit  to  New<\/span><span>  castle,  andtwill  lecture  to-niglit  and  to<\/span><span>  morrow  lnutho  Viotoria  Theatre.  No  man<\/span><span>  baa  a  greater  stare  of  Informataon  or  a<\/span><span>  happier  knuck  of.popularlonigsclnce.  Mr.<\/span><span>  Wraggo  is  at  present  returnlng  from  the<\/span><span>  top  or  Koscnlusao.  andin  lecturing  under  tilo<\/span><span>  auspices  of  tho  Ausntrlian  Church.  When<\/span><span>  Ianst  lecturing  for  the  Rev.  D.  Fraser,  he<\/span><span>  was  on  bis  way  to  the  Paris  Exhibitlon.<\/span><span>  To-night  he  will  display  some  of  its  mar<\/span><span>  vels,  espcilally  tlhe  marvels  of  the<\/span><span>  heavens,  an  seen  througi  its  great  tele<\/span><span>  scope.  The  pictures  are  all  new  and  ths<\/span><span>  same  as  were  used  by  tho  distingulshed<\/span><span>  lecturer  at  the  Imperial  Institute.  Los<\/span><span>  don.  During  his  slay  In  Newcastle  Mr.<\/span><span>  Wraggo  will  be  the  goeot  of  the  Rev.  D.<\/span><span>  mraser.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"70068753","url":"\/newspaper\/70068753","heading":"'WRAGGE.'","category":"Article","title":{"id":"202","value":"The Sunbury News (Vic. : 1900 - 1927)"},"date":"1903-02-07","page":4,"pageSequence":4,"relevance":{"score":"266.83124","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"We have received a copy of the above which is a journal devoted chiefly to the science of meteorology. It is owned and conducted by Mr. Clement","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/70068753?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  'WRAGGE'  -  we  have  received  a  copy<\/span><span>  of  the  above,  which  is  a  journal  devoted<\/span><span>  chiefly  to  the  science  of  meteorology.  It<\/span><span>  is  owned  and  conducted  by  Mr.  Clement<\/span><span>  Wragge.<\/span><span>  <\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"193580452","url":"\/newspaper\/193580452","heading":"WRAGGE.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1006","value":"Manilla Express (NSW : 1899 - 1954)"},"date":"1903-06-03","page":3,"pageSequence":3,"relevance":{"score":"266.50745","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"ANOTHER fixture for busy June. Mr. Clement Wragge has secured the local Mechanics' Institute for Monday night next, Line 8, when he will deliver","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/193580452?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  \"WRAGGE.  \"  .<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  I  Another  fixture  for  busy  June.  Mr.<\/span><span>  Clement  Wrngge  has  secured  the  local<\/span><span>  Mechanics'  Institute  for  Monday  night<\/span><span>  next,  .Line  8,  when  he  will  deliver<\/span><span>  one  of  his  educational  entertainments..<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Tlmstfbject  for  the  evening  will  he  —<\/span><span>  VJCCoyago  through  tho  Universe\"  ;<\/span><span>  tipjriint  Paris  IpI  escape  nnd,  the<\/span><span>  :oon  ;  when  good  seasons  will  come;<\/span><span>  d  a  qieep  at  Kosciusko,  illustrate<\/span><span>  mfghout  with  magnificent  pictures,<\/span><span>  'eh-  have  never  been  seen  in  these<\/span><span>  s  before.  Mr.  Wrngge  line  fillod<\/span><span>  ge  a  place  -in  the  imaginations<\/span><span>  alians  in  his  \"  wua-th'er  fore-<\/span><span>  it  the  present  opportunity  of<\/span><span>  u  in  person  will  no  doubt<\/span><span>  availed  of.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"75967490","url":"\/newspaper\/75967490","heading":"Wragge.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"188","value":"The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1894 - 1954)"},"date":"1903-04-22","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"266.50745","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"THERE is surely no name better known to the average Australian than that of \"Wragge.\" Everyone feels an interest in what \"Old Wragge\" has to say","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/75967490?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  Wragge:<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  THERE  is  surely  no  name  better  known<\/span><span>  to  die  average  Australian  than  that  of<\/span><span>  \"  Wragge.\"  Everyone  feels  an  interest<\/span><span>  in  what  \"Old  Wragge\"  has  to  nay<\/span><span>  aboat  that  all-absorbing  topic-the<\/span><span>  weather;  and  not  only  is  Mr.  Clement<\/span><span>  Wragge'b  name  a  household  word<\/span><span>  throaghoot  Australia,  it  is  honoured  in<\/span><span>  scientific  circles  in  every  country  in  (he<\/span><span>  world.  A  visit,  therefore,  from  such  an<\/span><span>  eminent  meteorologist  is  an  event  for<\/span><span>  Dubbo,  and  it  can  only  have  been  owing<\/span><span>  to  the  shortness  of  the  notice  that  the<\/span><span>  attendance  at  his  lectares  on  Friday<\/span><span>  and  Saturday  last  was  meagre.  Of  at<\/span><span>  tractive  personality,  Ur.  Wragge  quickly<\/span><span>  gets  into  touch  with  his  audiences,  and<\/span><span>  carries  them  sympathetically  with  him  i»<\/span><span>  his  \"Voyage  through  the  Universe.\"<\/span><span>  His  enthnsiasm  is  touching  to  witness;<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  and  his  eager  scrutiny  of  the  wonderful<\/span><span>  pictures  he  throws  on  tbe  screen,  just<\/span><span>  as  though  he  had  not  seen  them  hun<\/span><span>  dreds  of  times  before,  shows  how<\/span><span>  thoroughly  be  is  wrapped  np  in  .his<\/span><span>  science.  While  his  descriptions  of  the<\/span><span>  marvels  of  the  universe  are  naturally<\/span><span>  conched  in  noble  language  befitting  the<\/span><span>  sabject,  Mr.  Wragge  occasionally  drops<\/span><span>  in  a  gleam  of  qaaint  humour  which<\/span><span>  serves  to  brighten  the  lecture  ;  and  the<\/span><span>  two  hours  during  which  he  discourses<\/span><span>  pass  nil  too  quickly  away.  Interspersed<\/span><span>  with  his  vivid  word-painting  of  ran<\/span><span>  storms,  \"  tbe  birth  of  euns,\"  and  other<\/span><span>  marvels  of  the  infinite,  are  strewn  real<\/span><span>  pearls  in  morality,  religion,  and  philos<\/span><span>  ophy,  conveyed  in  such  a  way  that  they<\/span><span>  sink  into  tbe  mind,  and  benefit  the<\/span><span>  hearer  who  ponders  on  them.  An  in<\/span><span>  tense  lover  of  Nature  in  *11  its  varied<\/span><span>  -forms,  Wragge  enthusiastically  points<\/span><span>  out  the  beauties  contained  in  the  most<\/span><span>  widely  diversified  objects  ;  he  can  see  tbe<\/span><span>  wondrous  work  of  the  Great  Architect  as<\/span><span>  well  in  the  tiniest  flower  a*  in  tbe  making<\/span><span>  of  tbe  sun,  and  helps  his  audienoes  to<\/span><span>  eee  it  also.  After  a  talk  with  Wragge<\/span><span>  -forit  is  more  of  a  friendly  talk  than  a<\/span><span>  lecture-one  comes  away  with  a  profound<\/span><span>  impression  of  tbe  immensity  of  the  un<\/span><span>  known  world  of  Space,  and  a  conviction<\/span><span>  that  the  petty  worries  of  fragile  human<\/span><span>  ity  are  of  little  moment  in  the  great<\/span><span>  echeme  of  Nature.  Mr.  Wragge's  great<\/span><span>  mission  in  life  is  to  perfect  the  knowledge<\/span><span>  of  meteorology,  one  of  the  most  useful  of<\/span><span>  sciences,  seeing  that  by  its  aid  its  stu<\/span><span>  dents  will  in  time  be  able  to  forecast  with<\/span><span>  accuracy  the  seasons,  many  years  in<\/span><span>  advance,  and  so  benefit  humanity  at<\/span><span>  large;  and  it  is  a  pity  that  the  Gobi<\/span><span>  monwealth  oaunot-or  does  not-make<\/span><span>  suoh  provision  as  would  enable  this<\/span><span>  scientist  to  cairy  on  his  work  untram<\/span><span>  melled  by  the  difficulties  of  \"  making<\/span><span>  ends  meet.\"<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  In  regard  to  the  Great  Drought,  it  is<\/span><span>  interesting  to  note  that  Mr.  Wragge's<\/span><span>  theory  as  to  its  cause  in  some  measure<\/span><span>  coincides  with  that  of  Mr.  Bnssell<\/span><span>  that  it  is  connected  with  tbe  declinations<\/span><span>  of  tbe  moon;  but  Wragge  goes  further<\/span><span>  still,  and  traces  a  connection  between  the<\/span><span>  drought  and  the  Btorms  in  the  sun,<\/span><span>  pointing  ont  that  when  these  are  at  com<\/span><span>  parative  rest,  droughts,  eruptions  and<\/span><span>  earthquakes  occur  on  this  earth,  Mr.<\/span><span>  Wragge  holds  (hat  the  drought  is<\/span><span>  now  breaking;  that  (here  will  be  good<\/span><span>  rain  this  year,  more  next  year,  and  more<\/span><span>  still  the  following  year;  that  there  will<\/span><span>  be  a  succession  of  good  seasons  until<\/span><span>  1911,  when  the  son's  minimum  of  activity<\/span><span>  will  again  oocur,  and  another  drought<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  will  set  in.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Our  space  will  not  allow  of  a  detailed<\/span><span>  report  of  Mr.  Wiagge's  lectures*,  bnt<\/span><span>  we  may  refer  to  (hose  points  which  are<\/span><span>  of  more  special  interest.  On  Friday<\/span><span>  night,  after  an  outburst  of  loyalty,  be<\/span><span>  took  his  bearers  through  the  illimitable<\/span><span>  realms  of  spaoe,  dealing  in  a'  familiar<\/span><span>  way  with  sun-spots,  sun-stormB,  eclipses,<\/span><span>  and  other  phenomena,  and  gave  interest<\/span><span>  ing  facts  abont  the  moon,  tbe  whole<\/span><span>  being  illustrated  by  a  rapidly  changing<\/span><span>  series  of  pictures,  thrown  on  a  screen  by<\/span><span>  means  of  a  powerful  acety  line  lamp.  He<\/span><span>  described  the  *'  colour  zones,\"  showing<\/span><span>  how  nature  had  arranged  that  the  popu<\/span><span>  lation  of  the  earth  should  be  black  at  the<\/span><span>  broadest  and  .hottest  portion  of  its  cir<\/span><span>  cumference,  and  thence  gradually  lighten<\/span><span>  ing  as  the  latitude  increased  north  or<\/span><span>  south;  from  this  he  drew  the  conclusion<\/span><span>  that  a  \"white  Australia  is  impossible<\/span><span>  and  absurd,\"  the  northern  portion  of  our<\/span><span>  continent  being  within  the  darkest  zone.<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wragge  dwelt  strongly  on  the  neces<\/span><span>  sity  for  water  conservation-be  suggested<\/span><span>  that  we  should  pray  for  sense  to  teach  us<\/span><span>  how  to  save  the  rain  that  was  sent  dur<\/span><span>  ing  the  years  of  the  sun's  \"  maximum.''<\/span><span>  \"  Let  us  work  and  think  more-use  oar<\/span><span>  brains  \"-«nd  we  will  be  able  to  tide  over<\/span><span>  the  years  of  drought  caused  by  ,  the<\/span><span>  recurring  solar  \"  minimum.\"<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  On  Saturday  evening  Mr.  Wragge<\/span><span>  devoted  his  lecture  largely  to  a  descrip<\/span><span>  tion  of  the  various  scientific  instruments<\/span><span>  used  in  meteorology,  and  explained  the<\/span><span>  many  uses  to  whiob  the  soience  conld  be<\/span><span>  applied-warning  ships  of  dangerous<\/span><span>  storms,  foretelling  rain,  etc.  He  ex<\/span><span>  plained  his  method  -of  collecting  reports<\/span><span>  from  all  parts  of  Australasia,  by  which<\/span><span>  he  was  able  to  forecast  the  approach  of<\/span><span>  cyclones-low-pressure  Eones  ;  anticy<\/span><span>  clones-high-pressure  eones;  and  ant<\/span><span>  arctic  disturbances-inverted  V-shaped<\/span><span>  storms.  He  also  described  the  construc<\/span><span>  tion  and  uses  of  (he  rain  guage,  and  (he<\/span><span>  origin  of  duststorms.  He  strongly  de<\/span><span>  nounced  the  \"insane  ringbarking\"that<\/span><span>  was  carried  on,  pointing  out  that  for<\/span><span>  ests  promote  rainfall,  and  advocating<\/span><span>  the  appointment  of  a  Federal  Conser<\/span><span>  vator  of  Forests.  Mr.  Wragge  spoke<\/span><span>  with  intense  earnestness  «n  the  subject<\/span><span>  of  water  conservation  and  irrigation,<\/span><span>  saying  the  whole  climate  of  the  west  could<\/span><span>  be  changed  by  these  means.  The  State<\/span><span>  shoiild  dam  our  rivers,  and  ose  every<\/span><span>  e&ort  to  utilise  the  immense  volumes  of<\/span><span>  water  that  now  ran  to  waste.  He<\/span><span>  painted  in  vivid  langnage  a  dream  in<\/span><span>  winch  he  thought  tbe  Mormons  had<\/span><span>  settled  at  Onnnamulla,  and  had  made<\/span><span>  (hat  desert  a  paradise  by  means  of<\/span><span>  irrigation,  just  as  they  had  converted<\/span><span>  the  arid  wastes  around  8alt  Lake  City<\/span><span>  into  fertile  fields.  In  oonclu  ing,  Mr.<\/span><span>  Wragge  claimed  that  tbs  fonoMti  inrnd<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  by  his  weather  bureau  were  correct  op<\/span><span>  to  99  per  cent.,  and  of  his  predictions  of  |<\/span><span>  approaching  cjolooio  diets  rb&ocea,  95<\/span><span>  per  cent,  were  aooarate.  Mr.  Wra*tge<\/span><span>  annoanoed  that  be  would  probably  re-|<\/span><span>  visit  Dabbo  ia  a  few  week*.  |<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"258166628","url":"\/newspaper\/258166628","heading":"Wragge.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1586","value":"The Nowra Colonist (NSW : 1899 - 1904)"},"date":"1903-05-13","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"265.84875","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Nowra is to he favored with a visit from Australia’s greatest meteorological scientist and astronomer, Mr Clement I. Wragge, who will give one of his educational","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/258166628?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  Wragge.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Nowra  is  to  he  favored  with  a  visit  from<\/span><span>  Australia's  greatest  meteorological  scientist<\/span><span>  and  astronomer,  Mr  Clement  L  Wragge,<\/span><span>  who  will  give  one  of  his  educational  entertainments<\/span><span>  in  the  School  of  Art*  ball  on<\/span><span>  Friday  evening  next,  15th.  The  suhjeut  for<\/span><span>  thfe  evening  will  tie  \"  A  Voyage  Through<\/span><span>  tbe  UniverBe.\"  The  ereat  Paris  telescope<\/span><span>  and  the  moon,  fto.,  will  lie  illustrated  with<\/span><span>  magnificeut  pictures,  most  of  which  have<\/span><span>  never  been  seen  in  the  States  before.  Mr<\/span><span>  Viagiic  has  tilled  so  large  a  plaoe  in  tbe<\/span><span>  imagination  of  Australians  in  his  weather<\/span><span>  forecasts,  possessing  almost  miraculous<\/span><span>  powers,  that  the  opportunity  of  viewing<\/span><span>  him  \"  in  person  \"  will  no  doubt  be  largely<\/span><span>  availed  ot<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"221344169","url":"\/newspaper\/221344169","heading":"\"WRAGGE.\"","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1177","value":"Crookwell Gazette (NSW : 1885 - 1954)"},"date":"1903-12-01","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"265.45914","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"ON page 4 of this issue we publish a sketch under the above bonding. Unfortunately the second [?]lumn of this was Dot submitted to the proof rea[?]er","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/221344169?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  \"WRAGGE.\"<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  On  page  4  of  this  issue  we  publish  a<\/span><span>  sketch  undor  tho  above  bonding.  Un<\/span><span>  fortunately  the  second  o  -lumn  of  this<\/span><span>  was  Dot  submitted  to  the  pnof-roa  lnr<\/span><span>  f  ir  revision,  aod  as  a  consequence<\/span><span>  several  errors  appear  therein.  The  in-<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  tention  of  the  writer,  however,  in  suoh<\/span><span>  oases  must  bn  at  onoe  obvious  ;  but<\/span><span>  the  proof  (for  such  only  it  is)  unrevised<\/span><span>  will  give  readers  an  idea  how  matter<\/span><span>  sometimos  loavos  the  oompuei'nr's<\/span><span>  hands.  In  this  easo  some  of  ih»  er<\/span><span>  rors  are  stupid  ones,  as  tho  reader  will<\/span><span>  readily  obs-rve.  For  inatanoo  the<\/span><span>  \"  look  \"  of  despair  should,  of  oiuriin<\/span><span>  read  ''rock\"  of  despair.  And  again,<\/span><span>  \"  Orthodoxy,  by  attempting  to  hold<\/span><span>  tn  tin  all  should  read  in  thrall,  In<\/span><span>  the  passage  \"  at  li-ait  no  m  <r->  than<\/span><span>  in  the  passing  lave  should  rend  in  tho<\/span><span>  passion  love  ;  and  \"  so  lacking  that<\/span><span>  attrihute  association  slioul  1  read,  \"  so<\/span><span>  lacking  that  attrihute  <rf  nssooiui  in,\"<\/span><span>  O  her  errors  are  princpally  literals  suoh<\/span><span>  as  ambiguous,  which  is  ipolt  without<\/span><span>  the  first  \"  u.\"  Our  roiders  wo  hope<\/span><span>  will  with  theso  oorrootions  ho  able  to<\/span><span>  readily  arrivo  at  tlio  writ  -r's  m  muing.<\/span><span>  Foderal  Ministers  and  oenl  ir  offioore<\/span><span>  of  the  Public  Sorvioo  intend  to  appeal<\/span><span>  to  tho  High  Court  against  th.-u'r  liabil<\/span><span>  ity  to  piy  Violoriin  income  tax.<\/span><span>  The  piistal  authorities  have  under<\/span><span>  consideration  on  auibmatin  manbine<\/span><span>  for  supplying  stamps  fro  '  .  pillar<\/span><span>  boxes.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"221344158","url":"\/newspaper\/221344158","heading":"WRAGGE","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1177","value":"Crookwell Gazette (NSW : 1885 - 1954)"},"date":"1903-12-01","page":4,"pageSequence":4,"relevance":{"score":"265.40765","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"PACK through the many--far too many : -- late drought stricken years, when mother earth lay gasping like a giant in the last throes of his death agony","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/221344158?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WRAGGE<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  [  BY  G.  F.  ]<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Back  through  the  many  —  far  too  many<\/span><span>  :  —  late  drought-stricken  years,  when<\/span><span>  mother  earth  lay  gasping  like  a  giant<\/span><span>  in  the  last  throes  of  his  death  agony  —<\/span><span>  and  the  dumb  animals  —  well  'tis  human<\/span><span>  that  they  are  dumb  and  can  but  moan<\/span><span>  their  piteous  protests  against  his  in-<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  satiable  greed  —  were  dying  in  thous<\/span><span>  ands  —  few  named,  if  any,  were  more<\/span><span>  prominently  before  the  Austral<\/span><span>  ian  public  than  that  of  Clement<\/span><span>  Wragge.<\/span><span>  For  years  the  papers  have  been<\/span><span>  anxiously  scanned  by  many  in  the  —<\/span><span>  for  a  long  time  —  vain  hope  that  his<\/span><span>  forecast  would  predict  the  breaking-<\/span><span>  up  of  the  long-protracted  drought;  so<\/span><span>  that  when  it  became  known  that  he<\/span><span>  was  about  to  pay  a  visit  Crookwell  I,<\/span><span>  with  many  others,  anticipating  a  men<\/span><span>  tal  feast,  went  to  hear  him,  and,  speak<\/span><span>  ing  for  myself  —  and  I  believe  I  may<\/span><span>  include  most  of  those  present  —  was  not<\/span><span>  disappointed.  A  dimly-lit  hall,  closely<\/span><span>  packed  with  sitters  in  the  centre,  a<\/span><span>  raised  platform  on  which  there  stood  a<\/span><span>  man  of  spare  form,  medium  height,<\/span><span>  with  slightly  bent  shoulders,  met  the<\/span><span>  eye.  On  the  edge  of  the  hall  stage<\/span><span>  some  distance  from  Mr.  Wragge  a<\/span><span>  screen  was  elevated,  upon  which  was<\/span><span>  projected  from  a  magic  lantern,  num-<\/span><span>  orous  magnificent  views  of  tho  heav-<\/span><span>  enly  bodiess,  the  astronomer  manipu<\/span><span>  lating  the  slides  and  describing  with<\/span><span>  eloquent  and  enthusiastic  phraseology<\/span><span>  the  different  objects  as  they  were  shad<\/span><span>  owed  forth  upon  the  screen.<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wragge's  address  could  scarcely<\/span><span>  be  termed  a  lecture  —  it  was  too  dis<\/span><span>  cursive  for  that—  but  whatover  it<\/span><span>  might  have  lacked  in  continuity  was<\/span><span>  amply  compensated  for  by  the  all-<\/span><span>  absorbing  enthusiasm  of  the<\/span><span>  man  that  like  an  electrical  current<\/span><span>  seemed  to  permeate  the  whole  of  his<\/span><span>  audience,  and  by  the  time  he  had  fin<\/span><span>  ished  I  don't  think  that  there  was  one<\/span><span>  of  his  hearers  but  was  in  full  sympathy<\/span><span>  with  him,  when  he  took  them  away<\/span><span>  with  him  in  his  voyage  amid  the<\/span><span>  planetary  systems  and  told  of  the<\/span><span>  Milky  Way,  with  its  countless  millions<\/span><span>  of  Suns,  billions  of  miles  apart,  yet<\/span><span>  with  their  lights  glowing  and  circum-<\/span><span>  fused  into  one  mighty  whole.  He<\/span><span>  exhibited  the  dead  Moon,  the  Lady<\/span><span>  Ghost  of  our  solar  system,  and  the<\/span><span>  awful  Sun-storms,  not  of  cool  refresh<\/span><span>  ing  rain,  but  leaping,  rusbiug,  madden<\/span><span>  ing  flames  ,  tearing  round  tho  orb  of<\/span><span>  day  thousands  upon  thousands  of  miles<\/span><span>  in  extent,  and  marvellous  calculations<\/span><span>  both  of  tiino  and  distance  flowed  flip-<\/span><span>  .  pantly  from  his  tonguo.  With  rap<\/span><span>  ture  lie  spoke  of  the  dark  uinbrro  the<\/span><span>  lovely  coronro,  and  the  beautiful  little<\/span><span>  nsterojds.  Wo  endeavoured  tofillow<\/span><span>  him,  till  our  souts  seemed  to  expand,<\/span><span>  aud  our  brains  awe-stricken  reeled<\/span><span>  '  drunk  with  the  sublimity  of  tho  infin<\/span><span>  ite.<\/span><span>  But  when  Mr.  Wragge  leaves  tho<\/span><span>  niarvollous  and  approaches  tho  specu<\/span><span>  lative,  we  find  it  difficult  to  wholly<\/span><span>  subscribe  to  some  of  hie  deductions.<\/span><span>  \"  For  several  years  past,\"  said  he,<\/span><span>  \"  the  sun  has  been  at  its  minimum,<\/span><span>  end  as  a  cunsequcuce  tho  internal<\/span><span>  hent  of  our  earth  has  been  forcod  out<\/span><span>  wards,  causing  several  ernptioms,  not<\/span><span>  ably  \"thst  of  Martinique.  Tho  crust<\/span><span>  has  contracted  in  such  parts  as  are<\/span><span>  Most  subject-  to  the  8un's  influence.\"<\/span><span>  The  correctness  of  this  stntomont  may<\/span><span>  he  doubtod,  because  whilst  thero  was  a<\/span><span>  drought  here,  there  was  plenty  of  ram<\/span><span>  in  England  nnd  Now  Zealand  ;  but<\/span><span>  that  was  accounted  for  by  tho  fact  that<\/span><span>  I  hoy  were  in  different  latitudes.  \"It  is<\/span><span>  ...  all  a  matter  of  latitude  —  latitude  is  the<\/span><span>  gront  factor,\"  said  he.<\/span><span>  Does  Mr,  Wraggo  forgot  that<\/span><span>  whilst  wo  were  nulTfiring  n  terrible<\/span><span>  drought  bore  there  were  torrmts  of<\/span><span>  rain  —  as  well  as  blood  —  in  South<\/span><span>  AfricnJ?  Yet  his  theory  may  bo  cor-<\/span><span>  rcct,  but  only  under  one  supposition,<\/span><span>  and  thnt  is  that  the  popular  belief  thai<\/span><span>  the  crust  of  our  earth  is  of  a  uniform<\/span><span>  thickncs  is  a  fallacy  (nil  firmly  bolieve<\/span><span>  mysslf  it  is),  nnd  that  the  world  is<\/span><span>  solid  in  parts  —  in  fact  as  solid  ns  our<\/span><span>  Labour  Party.  Of  course  if  such  be<\/span><span>  tba  case  a  compression  whore  tho  crust<\/span><span>  was  thin  might  lead  to  a  corresponding<\/span><span>  expansion  where  it  was  thick,  even  in<\/span><span>  the  same  latitude.<\/span><span>  In  almost  wild,  enthusiastic  torms<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wraggo  described  his  visit  to  the<\/span><span>  palace  of  tho  great  telosoope  of  Paris<\/span><span>  and  his  interviow  with  the  courteous,<\/span><span>  refined,  cultured,  French  Minister  of<\/span><span>  Instruction.<\/span><span>  We  oonjurtd  up  in  our  mind's  eye<\/span><span>  the  vision  of  a  slightly-bent  figure<\/span><span>  eagerly  hurrying  through  tlifl  crowded<\/span><span>  streets  of  the  city.  What  to  him  was<\/span><span>  the  thousands  of  objects  of  hosuty<\/span><span>  that  ho\"  might  have  feasted  his  eyas<\/span><span>  with  ?  Thero  was  but  one  object  thnt<\/span><span>  had  an  attraction  for  him—  tlie  grent<\/span><span>  toleicope.  Away  in  his  far  home,<\/span><span>  washed  by  the  waves  of  the  Pacific<\/span><span>  Ocean,  _  he  had  viewed  it  with  his  men<\/span><span>  ial  vision  ;  he  had  dreamt  of  it,  and<\/span><span>  lie  bnd  voyaged  thousands  of  miles<\/span><span>  that  he  might  confirm  by  ocular  de<\/span><span>  monstration,  what  his  wildest  hopes<\/span><span>  hsd  never  led  him  to  bolieve  possible.<\/span><span>  Imagine  tho  Moon  to  the  vision  but<\/span><span>  threo  miles  distance  !  And  now  lis<\/span><span>  ws  in  the  presence  of  this  wonder  of<\/span><span>  modern  genius  !<\/span><span>  Will  you  like  to  lake  a  promen  ,<\/span><span>  ade  and  view  tho  grounds  connected<\/span><span>  with  the  palace  of  the  telescope  t<\/span><span>  Shall  apartmonts  b  prepared  for  you  ?<\/span><span>  \"Will  you  visit  a  restaurant,\"  and  there<\/span><span>  was  something  about  cognag.<\/span><span>  It  was  the  Minister  for  Education<\/span><span>  who  spoke  thus,-  but  Mr.  Wragge<\/span><span>  learnt  that  ho  could  get  a  room  on<\/span><span>  tho  spot  and  spend  the  whole  night  with<\/span><span>  his  lovo.  He  did  not  toll  us  whether  he<\/span><span>  had  tho  cognag.  What  bridegroom  over<\/span><span>  tingled  with  deeprr  ecstasy  For  the<\/span><span>  fulfilment  of  his  anticipated  joy<\/span><span>  than  this  enthusiastic  seer  did  for  the<\/span><span>  approach  of  night  f<\/span><span>  Wa  heard,  too,  of  his  labours  nmtd<\/span><span>  the  snows  of  Kosciusko,  and  how<\/span><span>  when  the  gale  tore  madly  across  the<\/span><span>  mountains  nnd  demolished  the  Irnt<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  which  the  bravo  Australian  boys'  stood<\/span><span>  to  their  posts  and  ticked  off  tho  re<\/span><span>  cords.<\/span><span>  \"  Why  did  thoy  do  this  ?\"  asked<\/span><span>  Iho  astronomer,  insortiugn  slide  that<\/span><span>  rrdceuentod  a  hugo  bull  dog  with  the<\/span><span>  Union  Jack  for  background.  And<\/span><span>  thon  ho  aoswored  his  own  question,<\/span><span>  \"  Because  they-  woro  boys  of  tho  '  bull<\/span><span>  dog  '  breed.<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wraggo  is  English,  and  of<\/span><span>  course  to  such  our  virtues  are  Brit<\/span><span>  ish,  but  our  vices  are  exclusively  our<\/span><span>  own.  Fuuuy,  is  it  not  ;  but  so  long<\/span><span>  as  it  ploasCs  Ihem  that  way  lot  us  uot<\/span><span>  cavil.<\/span><span>  _Noxt  we  were  told  of  his  intorview<\/span><span>  witli  our  State  Promior,  Sir  John  See,<\/span><span>  ann  it  certainly  did  Dot  convey  au  ex<\/span><span>  alted  opinion  to  our  present  Stats<\/span><span>  Promior,  Sir  John  Sop,  and  it  cer<\/span><span>  tainly  did  not  convoy  an  cxaltod  opin<\/span><span>  ion  to  our  minds  of  tho  mental  refine<\/span><span>  ment  of  that  worthy,  Tho  huckster<\/span><span>  ing  way  in  which  ho  criticise!  eaoh<\/span><span>  item  of  tlio  bill  of  costs  —  \"  What<\/span><span>  wore  tho  gloves  for,  and  what  the<\/span><span>  whisky,  aud  why  tho  salts  ?  were<\/span><span>  humorously  recited  by  Mr.  Wragge.<\/span><span>  But  perhaps  tho  poor  Premier  feared<\/span><span>  his  colleagues.  Mr.  O'SulIivan  might<\/span><span>  objoct  to  (lie  sum  total,  as  thore  was<\/span><span>  littlo  manual  work  nttaeliod  to  it,  and<\/span><span>  it  excooJed  tlio  minimum  wago  stand<\/span><span>  ard.  But  thou  tho  coarse,  brutal  rc-<\/span><span>  tnnrk,  \"  Why  don't  you  got  fat,<\/span><span>  Wragge  ?\"  was  all  his  own.  The<\/span><span>  latter  might  hitve  replied  that  ho  had<\/span><span>  not  speculated  in  resumptions,  but  that<\/span><span>  would  bare  been  descending  to  the<\/span><span>  other's  level  ;  bo  ho  could  only  re<\/span><span>  main  silent.  He  had  said  in  the<\/span><span>  course  of  his  lecture  that  ho  had  not<\/span><span>  beet)  able  to  discover  a  \"  hell  but<\/span><span>  ho  must,  have  regretted  his  inability<\/span><span>  to  locate  one  at  the  termination  of<\/span><span>  this  interview.<\/span><span>  \"  Pray  loss  and  dam,  darn,  dam<\/span><span>  inoro  !\"  exclaimed  Mr.  Wragge.<\/span><span>  Of  courso  part  of  this  advice  was<\/span><span>  but  a  figure  of  speech,  and  an  ex<\/span><span>  hortation  to  out  people  to  conserve<\/span><span>  water,  but  taken  in  connection  with<\/span><span>  the  fact  that  lie  is  a  firm  believer<\/span><span>  in  the  theory  of  evolution,  and  snaps<\/span><span>  his  fingers  at  tho  creeds,  the  ndvico<\/span><span>  to  pray  less  has  another  significance,<\/span><span>  and  ho  should  not  forgat  that  prayer,<\/span><span>  ro  many,  ersn  when  a  ma'orial  bone-<\/span><span>  fit  ii  not  expected,  .has  a  marvellous<\/span><span>  sustaining  effect.  It  is  not  surpris<\/span><span>  ing  that  superior  minds  such  as  that<\/span><span>  of  Mr.  Wraggo  should  revolt  with<\/span><span>  extreme  disgust  at  theology  as  taught<\/span><span>  —  it's  churchman's  jargon  ;  its  dog<\/span><span>  matic  positiveness  ;  its  contemptible,<\/span><span>  bitter,  not  to  say,  savagp,  sectarian<\/span><span>  ism,  and  above  all,  the  vile  purposes<\/span><span>  to  which  man,  in  bis  solfith  designs<\/span><span>  to  ovitr-raach  his  fellows  has  applied<\/span><span>  it.  Besides  astronomy  has  done  rauoh<\/span><span>  to  refute  biblical  statements,  though<\/span><span>  it  should  not  be  forgotten  that  its<\/span><span>  twin  sister,  geology,  that  is  less  spacu-<\/span><span>  Utivii  and  certainly  more  tangible,<\/span><span>  has  an  awkward  habit  of  confirming<\/span><span>  many  of  them.<\/span><span>  There  is  a  myetsrious  olement  in<\/span><span>  man's  nature  and  impelling  him  t<\/span><span>  seek  the  unattainable,  and  I  rauoh<\/span><span>  doubt  whather  constituted  as  he  is  —<\/span><span>  a  personally  visible  God  —  would<\/span><span>  alisfy  him.<\/span><span>  Philosophers  had  1-arnt  agos  ago<\/span><span>  that  the  tree  of  knowledgo  is  not  that<\/span><span>  of  life  and  that  all  men  should  know<\/span><span>  that  nothing  osn  be  known.  We  are<\/span><span>  told  that  Moeos  daro  1  to  question  the<\/span><span>  Almighty  presonoe  and  received  the<\/span><span>  seemingly  ambigous  reply,  \"  I  Am<\/span><span>  that  I  Am.\"  Jesus,  with  his  mir-<\/span><span>  vollous  power  of  nbridginrn',  roproved<\/span><span>  his  doubting  disciple  —  with  the  fow<\/span><span>  brief  sontvnees—  \"  Blessed  are  thoy<\/span><span>  that  havo  not  seen  yet  have  be<\/span><span>  lieved.\"<\/span><span>  It  is  well  for  man  to  permit  his<\/span><span>  mind  to  voyage  into  any  known  or<\/span><span>  even  unexplored  sea  of  thought  —  but<\/span><span>  'tis  wiso  ere  sotting  out  that  he  have<\/span><span>  on  board  the  sheet  anolior  of  trust<\/span><span>  .and  hope,  so  lh.it  when  ho  gets  amid<\/span><span>  the  shoais  of  doubt,  thny  may  save<\/span><span>  him  from  tho  look  of  despair,  so  thnt<\/span><span>  he.  be  not  driven  to  exolaim,  with<\/span><span>  Byron,—<\/span><span>  \"  Poor  oliild  of  doubt  and  death,<\/span><span>  Whose  liopoo  aro  built  on  roedi  I  \"<\/span><span>  Orthodoxy,  by  attempting  to  hold  in<\/span><span>  the  all  the  intellect  of  human  beings,<\/span><span>  hae  done  morn  harm  to  the  osuse  of<\/span><span>  true  religion  than  tho  personal  ex<\/span><span>  ample  of  many  of  its  cupportors,  and<\/span><span>  that  le  enying  much.  Tho  vital<\/span><span>  principles  of  religion  rests  wholly  and<\/span><span>  solely  upon  faith  and  hope.  Tho  God<\/span><span>  of  the  soientist.  The  Great  Dynamo,<\/span><span>  The  Mighty  Atom,  or  what  you  will,<\/span><span>  is  very  realistio,  very  material,  in  fact<\/span><span>  —  tho  God  of  reason.  But  thero  is<\/span><span>  no  reason  in  true  belief  —  at  least  no<\/span><span>  more  than  in  the  passing  love  —  is  not<\/span><span>  necessary  that  thero  should  be.  In<\/span><span>  short  the  God  of  tho  soientiet  is  not  an<\/span><span>  attribute  of  our  obildhoods  conceptions.<\/span><span>  So  lacking  that  alternate  association<\/span><span>  we  can  have  none  of  him.<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wragge,  at  the  olose  of  hi»<\/span><span>  remarks,  complimented  his  aadionoe<\/span><span>  on  their  intelligence  as  displayed  by<\/span><span>  so  many  having  oome  to  hear  him,<\/span><span>  and  said  thnt  at  many  of  his  .lectures<\/span><span>  but  few  would  attend,  as  they  pre<\/span><span>  ferred  to  stay  away  and  play  at  dom<\/span><span>  inoes  or  toad  in  the  hole,  whatsvar<\/span><span>  game  that  is  oonoluded  tho  speaker.<\/span><span>  I  havo  made  onquiries  but  cannot<\/span><span>  aiosrtain  many  particulars  oonoerning<\/span><span>  it,  but  understand  that  it  is  very<\/span><span>  popular  so  couolude  thnt  it  is  some  old<\/span><span>  game  under  a  new  appellation.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"237595933","url":"\/newspaper\/237595933","heading":"\"WRAGGE.\"","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1297","value":"The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930)"},"date":"1902-07-08","page":6,"pageSequence":6,"relevance":{"score":"265.40765","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr. Clement Wragge has announced his intention of publishing a weekly newspaper, under the title of \"Wragge,\" which will be the official organ of his central weather bureau.","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/237595933?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  .  \"WRAGGE,\"<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Mr.  Clement'  Wragge  has  announced  his  inten<\/span><span>  tion  of  publishing  a  weekly  newspaper,  under  the<\/span><span>  title  ot  \".Wragge,\"  which  will  bo  the  official<\/span><span>  organ  of  his  central  weather  bureau.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"107200975","url":"\/newspaper\/107200975","heading":"Wragge.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"514","value":"The Peak Hill Express (NSW : 1902 - 1952)"},"date":"1906-06-01","page":19,"pageSequence":19,"relevance":{"score":"264.98822","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"CLEMENT WRAGGE hovers about like Adam round the back fence of Paradise. The Commonwealth Weather, Bureau is what Wragge is waiting for.","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/107200975?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  [?]<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Clsment  Wraoge  hovers  about  like<\/span><span>  Adam  round  the  back  fence  of  Para<\/span><span>  dise.  The  Commonwealth  Weather__^<\/span><span>  Bureau  is  what  Wragge  is  waiting  for.<\/span><span>  As  a  sort  of  livenfer  he  throws  out  the<\/span><span>  gratuitous  prophecy  that  AngraUa  »<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  going  to  strike  a  wg  arougu*  i»  »-.  -?  «<\/span><span>  As  The  figures  of  this  year  (lto)  ^J|<\/span><span>  added  together  make  13  and  ^ie  W-  -  ij<\/span><span>  lowing  year  will  be  1913  we  inay  r  «x-  -:m<\/span><span>  pect  something  but  of  ttorif*W;  -1<\/span><span>  However,  there  is  t»o  doubt  that  5|j<\/span><span>  Wragge  is  right.  We  ouglit  to  have  a  --m<\/span><span>  Commonwealth  weather  bureau.  And  ;J|<\/span><span>  we  ought  to  wake  Wragge  bureauM*.  Jj<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"147659023","url":"\/newspaper\/147659023","heading":"WRAGGE.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"739","value":"The South-Western News (Busselton, WA : 1903 - 1954)"},"date":"1906-06-08","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"264.3338","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"In Hedley's Hall, on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, Mr. Clement Wragge, the eminent astronomical scientist, lectured to appreciative","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/147659023?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WRAGGE.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  In  Hedley's  Hall,  on  Tuesday  and<\/span><span>  Wednesday  evenings,  Mr.  Clement<\/span><span>  Wragge,  the  eminent  astronomical<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  scientist,  lectured  to  appreciative  ]<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  audiences.  \"The  wonders  of  the,j<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Universe\"  and'  \"the  majesty  of<\/span><span>  Creation,\"  the  titles  of  the  lectures,<\/span><span>  are  but  poor  descriptions  of  the<\/span><span>  immensely  instructive  and  unique<\/span><span>  discourses.  Mr.  Wragge  throws  his<\/span><span>  whole  being  into  his  descriptions  of<\/span><span>  the  wonders  and  mysteries  of  the<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Universe,  and  succeeds  in  holding  !<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  the  attention  of  his  hearers  to  a<\/span><span>  marked  extent.  The  lectures  are<\/span><span>  copiously  illustrated  by  limelight<\/span><span>  views.  On  Monday  evening  next<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wragge  will  again  lecture  in<\/span><span>  Busselton.  On  Tuesday  and  Wed<\/span><span>  nesday  he  will  visit  Karridale  and<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  lecture  in  the  Agricultural  Hall,  and<\/span><span>  on  Friday  evening  he  will  speak  on<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  \"the  wonders  of  the  Universe\"  at<\/span><span>  the  Cave-house,  Yallingup.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"245304678","url":"\/newspaper\/245304678","heading":"WRAGGE.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"1190","value":"The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954)"},"date":"1873-11-18","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"264.3338","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Alderman W[?]agge it is well known is \"great\" at points of order. They are the worthy alderman's sharpest and brightest sword, and his most comprehensive shield.","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/245304678?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WBAGGE.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  A  Id  or  man  Wiaggo  it  is  well  known  is<\/span><span>  \"great\"  at  points  of  ordor.  They  are  tbe<\/span><span>  worthy  alderman's  sharpest  and  brightest<\/span><span>  sword,  and  his  most  comprehensive  shield.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  They  aro  Wra  .ge'ntorrible  tomahawk,  whioh<\/span><span>  smashes  in  tho  metaphorical  skull  of  an<\/span><span>  opponent,  bo  it  over  so  tliiok.  They  are  the<\/span><span>  magic  wand  of  the  great  municipal  conjuror<\/span><span>  by  whioh  he  gracefully  reverses  the<\/span><span>  natural  order  of  things  in  tho  City<\/span><span>  Council,  and  fashions  everything  to  hfa<\/span><span>  own  will.  l'hoso  points  of  .  order  are<\/span><span>  all-phwerful  in  tho  hnndB  of  Wragge.<\/span><span>  But  by  a  oniinus  contradiction,  Alderman<\/span><span>  Wrague'a  points  of  order,  instead  of  promot-<\/span><span>  ing  order,  invariably  orento  tho  moat  doplora-<\/span><span>  blo  rf\/sorder.  There  was  a  brief  mepting  of<\/span><span>  the  oity  council  yesterday,  and  Alderman<\/span><span>  Wraggo'w  s  there.  The  items  of  business<\/span><span>  were  no?  numerous,  and  they  wore  mostly  of<\/span><span>  a  routine  character.  Thore  was  no  opportu-<\/span><span>  nity  for  lottiug  off  a  point  of  order,  and  for<\/span><span>  a  ohsngo,  Alderman  Wragge  made  an<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  attempt  to  get  the  Mayor  an  iaoroase  o<\/span><span>  \"screw.\"  Their  worships  the  chief  magis<\/span><span>  trates  of  the  oity  havo  hitherto  ro<\/span><span>  oeived  £1000  a-yoar.  as  an  indemnity<\/span><span>  for  their'  self-sacridce  in  tho  interests  of<\/span><span>  their  follow  citizens  by  accepting  .  tho  office<\/span><span>  of  mayor,  and  as  a  trifling  remuneration  for<\/span><span>  the  arduous  physiosl  and  iatollootnatjlabors<\/span><span>  devolving  npon  the  holder  of  the  position.<\/span><span>  But.  Alderman  Wragge,  with  that  'munifl<\/span><span>  oenoe'  and  generosity  which  always,  charac<\/span><span>  terises  him,  saw  that  \"  tho  time  had.'oome  \"<\/span><span>  when'  the  mayor'B  wages  ought  to  bo'  raised  ;<\/span><span>  and,  thoreforo,  at  the  meeting  of  the  oounoil<\/span><span>  yesterday  he  moved  that  they  bo  incroasod<\/span><span>  from  £1000  to  £1600  for  the  year.  But  the<\/span><span>  great  alderman  who  has  hitherto  held  the<\/span><span>  position  of  an  autoerat  —  a  dospot  —  in  tho<\/span><span>  oounoil,  actually  had  not  one  solitary<\/span><span>  supportor  iu  this  movo  —  not  even  a  per<\/span><span>  spective  mayor  1  Alas,  for  human  faith  !<\/span><span>  w  here  were  all  those  who  formerly  looked<\/span><span>  up  to  Wraggo  with  awo  or  admiration,  and<\/span><span>  fluttered  around  him  at  the  sound  of  the<\/span><span>  division  boll  as  moths  round  the  light?  But<\/span><span>  could  not  tho  worthy  alderman  havo  oarried  '<\/span><span>  his  point  by  some  point  ol  order  or  other  ?<\/span><span>  and  if  unable  to  do  this,  could  ho  not  havo<\/span><span>  managed  to  stop  the  mayor's  \"  sorow  \"  alto<\/span><span>  gether?  The  ill  fate  of  Alderman  Wragge<\/span><span>  yesterday,  is  a.  Bign  of  the  timos—  iu  the  City<\/span><span>  Council  Wragge  has  fallen.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"124139700","url":"\/newspaper\/124139700","heading":"\"WRAGGE.\"","category":"Article","title":{"id":"377","value":"Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908)"},"date":"1902-07-22","page":7,"pageSequence":7,"relevance":{"score":"263.81412","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"THE above is the title of a weekly publication issued by Mr. Clement L. Wragge, F.R.G.S., as the official journal of the Central Weather Bureau. \"Fear no man. God","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/124139700?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  \"WRAGGE.\"<\/span><span>  THE  above  is  the  title  of  a  weekly  publica-<\/span><span>  tion  issued  by  Mr.  Clement  L.  Wragge,<\/span><span>  t.R.G.S.,  as  the  official  journal  of  the  Central<\/span><span>  Weather  Bureau.  \"Fear  no  manl.  God<\/span><span>  save  the  King  !\"  is  the  mananer  in  which  Mr.<\/span><span>  Wragge  winds  up  his  introductory  article,<\/span><span>  and  this  is  apparently  his  motto.  He  re<\/span><span>  mainds  the  public  that  the  Weather  Bureau  is<\/span><span>  now  subsidised  by  the  Governments  of  Queens<\/span><span>  land,  New  South  Wales,  and  Tasmanis  to  thlle<\/span><span>  extentof  £1000  per  annun,  but  as  this  is  lot<\/span><span>  asflicient  to  carry  it  on  efficiently  he  has<\/span><span>  -aken  it  into  his  own  hands,  and  appeals  to<\/span><span>  those  interested  in  the  foreoating  of  the<\/span><span>  weather  for  assistance.  Also  he  pertiinently<\/span><span>  -eminds  the  Federal  Government  that  if  they<\/span><span>  see  fit  to  inaugurate  a  Weather  Bureau  and<\/span><span>  offer  him  the  position  of  Chief  Meteorologist,<\/span><span>  he  may  consider  it  or  he  may  not,  but  that  if<\/span><span>  it  is  run  without  him  his  pnvate  bureau  will<\/span><span>  *tillbecarried  on,and  thepeopleshall  judgethe<\/span><span>  results.\"  The  Federalauthoritiencare  likewise<\/span><span>  gentlyremindedthattheyma,  takethedrawing<\/span><span>  of  the  Southern  Cross  constellation,  as  appear<\/span><span>  ing  on  the  front  cover'of  the  publication,  as<\/span><span>  an  accurate  guide  for  the  design  on  the  Fede<\/span><span>  alt  lag.  The  issue  underreview  iswritten  in<\/span><span>  Mr.  Wragge'scharacteristie  literary  style,  and<\/span><span>  contains  a  good  deal  of  information  of  a  scien<\/span><span>  tile,  educational,  and  practical  character.<\/span><span>  -There  is,  among  other  things,  an  article  by<\/span><span>  Herr  8tiger,  de~alig  with  that  scientist's<\/span><span>  t?orts  in  preventing  falls  of  hail  in  Italy,<\/span><span>  with  a  foot.note  by  Mr.  Wragge,  in  which  he<\/span><span>  promises  that  rain-producing  experiments  by<\/span><span>  six\"  Stigers\"  will  be  conducted  at  Charlecille<\/span><span>  shortly.  The  official  portion  of  the  journal<\/span><span>  deals  with  advices  and  weather  forecasts  for<\/span><span>  Australasia  and  the  separate  States.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"83156754","url":"\/newspaper\/83156754","heading":"\"WRAGGE.\"","category":"Article","title":{"id":"275","value":"The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950)"},"date":"1903-02-05","page":3,"pageSequence":3,"relevance":{"score":"263.81412","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"We have received from the editor, Mr. Clement L. \"Wragge, the current issue of his meteorological periodical, which contains \"many cheerful facts.\"","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/83156754?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  'WRAGGE.'   <\/span><\/p> <p><span>  We  have  received  from  the  editor,<\/span><span>  Mr.  Clement  L.  Wragge,  the  current<\/span><span>  issue  of  his  meteorological  periodical,<\/span><span>  which  contains  \"many  cheerful  facts.\"<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  For  example:—  'We  go  abroad  and  in<\/span><span>  struct  as  occasion  requires,  locking  into<\/span><span>  the  manner  in  which  our  pet  barome<\/span><span>  ters  and  thermometers  are  managed,<\/span><span>  and  supplies  the  want  in  the  shape  of<\/span><span>  a  milk-white  animal  'personal  equation'<\/span><span>  attaching  to  our  honored  and  well-be-<\/span><span>  loved  army  of  observers  and  officers.'<\/span><span>  We  do  not  understand  how  a  personal<\/span><span>  equation  can  be  a  milk-white  animal,<\/span><span>  but  the  difficulty  is  solved  to  some  ex<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  tent  by  an  extract  from  another  para<\/span><span>  raph:  —  \"Our  next,  concern  is  to  hire<\/span><span>  a  horse  presumably  accustomed  to  the<\/span><span>  sloughy  scrub  tracks,  and  a  friend  of<\/span><span>  mine  host  supplies  the  want  in  the  shape<\/span><span>  of  a  milk-white  animal  strangely  spotted<\/span><span>  with  bluish-grey,  which  rejoices  in  the<\/span><span>  name  of  'Lumington,'  after  our  late<\/span><span>  worthy  Governor.\"  It  is  also,  interest<\/span><span>  ing  to  learn  that  \"the  proximate  initial<\/span><span>  cause  of  the  rotation  of  cosmic  bodies<\/span><span>  is  probably  their  unequal  cooling  and<\/span><span>  contraction  while  gravitating  towards<\/span><span>  the  sun  or  common  centre  of  attraction,<\/span><span>  and  the  subsequent  gradual,  arrange<\/span><span>  ment  of  by  far  the  greater  part  of  their<\/span><span>  mass  nearer  to  their  equatorial  circum<\/span><span>  ference  than  to  their  ceture,  through<\/span><span>  the  operation  of  well-known  dynamical<\/span><span>  centrifugal  forces.  The  cause  of  the      <\/span><span>  different  inclinations  of  the  axes  to  the<\/span><span>  plane  of  the  orbits  would  then  be  the<\/span><span>  variation  of  the  planes,  in  which  origin<\/span><span>  ally  the  major  part  of  their  masses  were<\/span><span>  arranged.\"         <\/span><\/p> <p><span>  This  paper  is  described  as  being  edited,<\/span><span>  owned,  and  published  by  Clement  Lind<\/span><span>  ley  Wragge,  meteorologist  and  journa<\/span><span>  list.  (We  have  heard  a  paper  called  a<\/span><span>  'rag'  before  now—  Editor  'D.N.')<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"124153219","url":"\/newspaper\/124153219","heading":"WRAGGE'S VERSATILITY.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"377","value":"Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908)"},"date":"1898-02-08","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"240.79903","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"SINCE the Courier chastened our valued meteorologist for his absence when Nature turned on her flood-tap (which \"And [?] was powerless to stop), Mr. Wragge has opened","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/124153219?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WEaGGE'S  VEzsATnrr  .<\/span><span>  SICE  the  Courier  ehasteneI  our  valuet'<\/span><span>  meteorologist  for  his  absence  when  Nitre<\/span><span>  turned  on  her  flood-tap  (which  \"And,  l<\/span><span>  powerless  to  stop),  Mr.  Wraggo  has  Wei  :<\/span><span>  out  as  a  litterateur,  and  is  making  amends<\/span><span>  by  brightening  his  remarks  on  the  gloomy<\/span><span>  forecasts,  illustrating  the  techniealities  of\"<\/span><span>  his  department,  and  generally  providing  ex<\/span><span>  cellent  and  instructiveliterature.  It  is.o.<\/span><span>  copy,  without  doubt.  Mr.  Wragge's  width<\/span><span>  of  experience  is  great.  He  is  at  home  in<\/span><span>  the  elouds  and  snow  of  Kosoinusco,  he  eoars-?d<\/span><span>  into  the  clear  skies,  he  wings  the  desert  ai?<\/span><span>  of  the  interior.  He  takes  charge  of  the<\/span><span>  vessel  on  the  stormy  ocean,  and  rattles  of<\/span><span>  glibly  the  orders  in  correct  nautical  phrase<\/span><span>  ology.  He  knows  every  yard,  sail,  and<\/span><span>  rope.  He  chums  with  the  geologist  and<\/span><span>  the  botanist.  Whether  the  multiplication<\/span><span>  table  or  the  classics,  he  is  \"all  there.'?  He.<\/span><span>  has  recently  found  his  way  into  the  nursery,<\/span><span>  and  is  persuading  the  fond  mothers  '  to  call'<\/span><span>  their  infant  girls  by  the  pretty  bubbling<\/span><span>  names  of  the  maidens  of  the  '  Summer  Isles<\/span><span>  of  Eden.'\"  But  to  re-quote  Mr.  Wragge's<\/span><span>  quotation  from  Virgil  and  hasten  after<\/span><span>  \"Eline\":<\/span><span>  \"Cease  to  request  me;  let  us  mind  our  way::\"<\/span><span>  Another  song  requires  another  day.'!<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"124395205","url":"\/newspaper\/124395205","heading":"MR. WRAGGE.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"377","value":"Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908)"},"date":"1903-07-09","page":7,"pageSequence":7,"relevance":{"score":"240.79903","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr. Clement L. Wragge left by the steamer Lady Musgrave on Tuesday afternoon for the Clarence River district, in which he will conduct a lengthy lecturing tour.","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/124395205?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  MR.  *WRAGGE.<\/span><span>  Mr.  Clement  L.  Wragge  left  by  the  steamer<\/span><span>  Lady  Meegrave  on  Tuesday  afternoon  for  the<\/span><span>  Clarance  River  district,  in  which  he  will  con<\/span><span>  duct  a  lengthy  lecturing  tour.<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"129552613","url":"\/newspaper\/129552613","heading":"WRAGGE'S PROPHECIES.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"588","value":"Nhill Free Press (Vic. : 1914 - 1918)"},"date":"1914-03-24","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"240.79903","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr clement Wragge, the well-known meteorologist, is in Tasmania. He prophecies 1914 will still be marked by what Australians call drought; but the","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/129552613?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  \"WRAGGE'S  PROPHECIES,<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  3  iur  uiementi  Wragge,  the  well-known<\/span><span>  i  meteorologist,  is  in  Tasmania.  He<\/span><span>  )  prophecies  1914  will  still  be  marked  by<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  what  Australians  call  drought;  but  tho<\/span><span>  drought  so-called  this  year  should  not<\/span><span>  be  as  bad  as  1913.  Conditions  were<\/span><span>  improving.  By  the  end  o£  1915  the<\/span><span>  rainfall  Bhould  bo  up  to  the  average.<\/span><span>  In  1916,  and  on  to  1920  ho  forecasted<\/span><span>  good  seasons;  1921  and  1922,  falling<\/span><span>  oil;  1923  and  1924,  bad  drought;  1925<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  1926,  improving:  1927  to  1930,  good<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  seasons,<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"129561249","url":"\/newspaper\/129561249","heading":"WRAGGE'S FORECASTS.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"588","value":"Nhill Free Press (Vic. : 1914 - 1918)"},"date":"1916-12-01","page":2,"pageSequence":2,"relevance":{"score":"240.79903","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"Mr Clement L. Wragge, the celebrated meteorologist, when he visited Nhill in 1913 stated:—During 191314 and part of 1915 the rainfall, taking","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/129561249?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WRAGGE'S  FORECASTS.<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  Mr  Clement  L.  Wragge,  the  cele<\/span><span>  brated  meteorologist,  when  ho  visited<\/span><span>  Nhill  in  1913  stated:—During  1913<\/span><span>  14  and  part  of  1915  the  rainfall,  taking<\/span><span>  Australia  as  a  whole,  will  bo  under  the<\/span><span>  avorago.  This  by  no  means  implios<\/span><span>  that  there  will  bo  no  r*in  ;  on  the  con<\/span><span>  trary,  Rood  intervening  rain  will  oc<\/span><span>  cur,  largely  due  to  lunar  tides,  andtho<\/span><span>  last  part  of  this  period  will  bo  better<\/span><span>  than  the  first.  From  the  middle  of<\/span><span>  1915  onwards  the  raiof  ill  will  improve,<\/span><span>  and  will  markedly  increase.  From<\/span><span>  1916  to  1920  inclusive,  the  seasons  will<\/span><span>  be  difltinctly  good,  with  abundant<\/span><span>  precipitation,  but  slightly  lessoned  by<\/span><span>  lunar  influence.  After  1920  rainfall  will<\/span><span>  begin  to  steadily  fall  oil,  and  continue  to<\/span><span>  deorease  during  1921  and  1922,  nni  the<\/span><span>  worat  of  the  next  great  under-average<\/span><span>  period  will  bo  in  llJ23  and  1924,  and<\/span><span>  Australians  will  he  justified  in  those<\/span><span>  years  in  calling  it  a  diought.  In  1925<\/span><span>  ,matters  will  again  begin  to  improve,<\/span><span>  and  continue  improving  during  1926,<\/span><span>  and  good  seasons  will  prevail  from<\/span><span>  1927-1930  inclusive.\"  Mr  Wrapg'\"<\/span><span>  bases  his  forecasts  on  the  duration<\/span><span>  of  magnotic  eruptions  on  tho  sun's<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  surface<\/span><\/p> "},{"id":"171279431","url":"\/newspaper\/171279431","heading":"WRAGGE'S FORECAST.","category":"Article","title":{"id":"834","value":"Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922)"},"date":"1919-08-30","page":11,"pageSequence":11,"relevance":{"score":"240.79903","value":"very relevant"},"snippet":"About six weeks ago a party of farmers at Hay subscribed a sum of money and sent it to Mr. Clement Wraggo, the eminent meteorological","troveUrl":"https:\/\/trove.nla.gov.au\/ndp\/del\/article\/171279431?searchTerm=wragge","articleText":"<p><span>  WIUGGE'S.FORjaCAfJT.  .<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  About,  six  weeks,  ago  a  parly,.  ot<\/span><span>  farinor.'t  ill.  May  sulisiii'ibud  a  sum  of<\/span><span>  money  w'l.d  nei,it;,VU,  ,  lb!.,BP,.,,CI()iiient<\/span><span>  Wragge.  Uio  oiiiiiioiit'  kiutoprolbeisl,<\/span><span>  wilii  tlio  roiinpHt  Llliil  hiv  woiild.  pni;<\/span><span>  vide  ,u  (letifUod  tproi»8t  '  ii'is  lo  .fiii.iiro<\/span><span>  weatlior  conilitioiiH.,  Mr...  ,'Wnlj.sge  rr<\/span><span>  pliiMl  l.liiiiikliilv  tlm'  ,1'iil'iiini'R.'  for.Hniir<\/span><span>  iiniliid  cbiitrlbiitioii.  which  lie  said  lio<\/span><span>  i  hud  Klvonu.lo.theJiospital.  Ile.also<\/span><span>  -?'Boot,  tho  doB{re-l  ifor.ecaat\/''^lil®W-.was<\/span><span>  -to  the  effect,  that  somo  light  showers,<\/span><span>  bin:  uo.  rainfall'  or  nny  consequence<\/span><\/p> <p><span>  would  bccui1  iii.  Jilly,  but  that  in  'An-,<\/span><span>  gust  and-  ;S(eptottilibr  .\/copious  Jails-;<\/span><span>  might  be  expeclctl.  .'It  will  bo  noted<\/span><span>  Jjhat,'  tlier  forecast  .for.  July;  lias  proved<\/span><span>  correct,  ami  sti  far  ,tlio  August,  fore<\/span><span>  cast  given  promise,  of  being  fullUlcil,<\/span><\/p> "}]}}]}}
        

Examples

Click on any of the examples below to open them in this console, then modify them to suit. If you want to use them in your own code you'll need to get an API key and add &key=[Your API key] to the url.

See the Trove API documentation for a full list of available parameters and detailed information on constructing queries.

For more examples, tools, and hacks using the Trove API see the GLAM Workbench.

Basic search

Search all zones

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=all

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge

use a space or a '+' to get everything

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

all

possible values are 'all', 'newspaper', 'gazette', 'book', 'article', 'picture', 'music', 'map', 'collection', 'list', 'people'

Search in multiple zones

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=book,newspaper

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

book,newspaper

separate multiple zones with commas

Search in a single zone

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper

Change the results format

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

possible values are 'xml' (default) or 'json'

Change the number of results

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&n=100

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

possible values are 'xml' (default) or 'json'

n

number of results

100

possible values are 0 to 100 (default is 20)

Change the sort order

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&sort_by=dateasc

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

possible values are 'xml' (default) or 'json'

sortby

order of results

dateasc

possible values are 'relevance' (default), 'dateasc', 'datedesc'

Get the full metadata for each record

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&reclevel=full

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
reclevel

request additional article metadata

full

Adding reclevel=full adds a number of additional fields to the article metadata, the actual fields added depends on the zone. In newspapers and gazettes it adds illustrated, wordCount, correctionCount, tagCount, commentCount, listCount, trovePageUrl, and pdf (which is a link to a PDF of the whole page on which the article is published). In works it adds tagCount, commentCount, and listCount.

Include extra information in each record

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&include=tags,comments

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

possible values are 'xml' (default) or 'json'

include

include extra information

tags,comments

possible values include 'tags' and 'comments'; separate multiple values with commas

The accepted values for the include parameter differ across zones, but some values, like 'tags' and 'comments', are consistent. Other examples are included below.

Harvesting a complete result set

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&bulkHarvest=true&s=*

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in

newspaper

you can only harvest from one zone at a time, so this must be set to a single zone such as 'newspaper'

encoding

format of results

json

possible values are 'xml' (default) or 'json'

bulkHarvest

setting this to 'true' ensures that results will stay in the same order when you request subsequent pages; without it results might be duplicated or missing

true
s

supply a resumption token to get the next page of results

*

use '*' for the first request, then replace with the value of nextStart for subsequent results

Three parameters are important when harvesting a complete result set: zone must be set to a single zone, bulkHarvest set to 'true', and s must be updated after each request with the value of nextStart. Note that the nextStart value will only appear if there is another page of results to download, so you can use it in your loop as a check to see if you've finished.

Searching newspapers or gazettes

Limit results by article category

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-category=Article

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-category

category to include

Article

see Trove help documentation, or use the category facet for full list of possible values

This parameter can be used multiple times, however, this will behave like an AND query and only those articles in all of the specified categories will be returned. So adding &l-category=Article&l-category=Advertising will return zero results, as no articles are in both the 'Article' and 'Advertising' categories.

Limit results by place of publication

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-state=Victoria

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-state

place in which articles were published

Victoria

possible values are 'ACT', 'International', 'National', 'New South Wales', 'Northern Territory', 'Queensland', 'South Australia', 'Tasmania', 'Victoria'

This parameter can be used multiple times. Unlike the category facet, this will behave like an OR query, returning articles published in any of the specified places. So adding &l-state=Victoria&l-state=ACT will return articles published in either Victoria or the ACT.

Limit results by decade

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-decade=192

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-decade

limit to articles from this decade

192

192 includes the years 1920 to 1929

Limit results by year

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-decade=192&l-year=1924

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-decade

limit to articles from this decade

192
l-year

limit to articles from this year (l-decade must also be set)

1924

limit the results to articles from 1924, the l-decade parameter must be set to 192

Limit results by month

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-decade=192&l-year=1924&l-month=3

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-decade

limit to articles from this decade

192
l-year

limit to articles from this year (l-decade must also be set)

1924

limit the results to articles from 1924

l-month

limit to articles from this month (l-decade and l-year must also be set)

3

limit the results to articles from March 1924, possible values are numbers from 1 to 12

Find articles on a specific page of a newspaper

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=firstpageseq:1&zone=newspaper&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

firstpageseq:1

use the firstpageseq index in the query to specify a page number, firstpageseq:1 will find articles on page 1

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

Find newspaper articles within a specific date range

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=date:[1942-10-31T00:00:00Z TO 1942-11-30T00:00:00Z]&zone=newspaper&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

date:[1942-10-31T00:00:00Z TO 1942-11-30T00:00:00Z]

use the date index to specify a date range; the first date in the range is not included in the query, so this example searches for articles from November 1942

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

Find newspaper articles from a particular day

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=date:[1942-11-01T00:00:00Z TO 1942-11-02T00:00:00Z]&zone=newspaper&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge date:[1942-11-01T00:00:00Z TO 1942-11-02T00:00:00Z]

use the date index to specify a date range; the first date in the range is not included in the query, so this example searches for articles from 2 November 1942

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json

Limit to articles with illustrations

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-illustrated=true

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-illustrated

limit to articles with illustrations

true

accepted values are 'true' or 'false'

Limit to articles with photographs

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-illustrated=true&l-illtype=Photo

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-illustrated

limit to articles with illustrations

true

accepted values are 'true' or 'false'

l-illtype

limit to articles with this type of illustration

Photo

the l-illustrated facet must be set to 'true'; common values include 'Photo', 'Cartoon', 'Map', and 'Illustration', set facet to 'illtype' to see all possible values

This parameter can be used multiple times, however, this will behave like an AND query and only those articles with all of the specified illustration types will be returned.

Filter articles by number of words

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-word=<100 Words

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
l-word

filter by number of words in the article

<100 Words

accepted values are '<100 Words', '100 - 1000 Words', or '1000+ Words'

Limit to articles with tags (or comments)

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge has:tags&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&include=tags

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge has:tags

add has:tags to limit to articles with tags; has:comments will similarly limit to articles with comments

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
include tags

you need to specifically include tags to see the tag values; change to 'comments' to include any comments

Get the OCRd text for each article

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&include=articletext

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
include

add additional information to the record

articletext

this adds the full OCRd text to the record, other possible values are 'tags', 'comments'

The OCRd text is return as HTML, so depending on you use you might need to strip the tags out.

Get the number of articles in each category

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=+&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&facet=category&n=0

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

+

'+' is an empty search, so will return everything

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
n 0

we don't need results, just the facets, so we can set n to 0

facet

include facet data

category

break down results by category; see the Trove API documentation for a full list of facets

Get the number of articles per year in a decade

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=+&zone=newspaper&encoding=json&l-decade=192&facet=year&n=0

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

+

'+' is an empty search, so will return everything

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

newspaper
encoding

format of results

json
n

number of results

0

we don't need results, just the facets, so we can set n to 0

l-decade

set the decade

192

needs to be set to find the totals by year

facet

include facet data

year

break down results by year in the given decade; see the Trove API documentation for a full list of facets

For more examples using the year facet see Visualise Trove newspaper searches over time in the GLAM Workbench.

Searching other zones

Limit to works with a particular format

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather&zone=book&encoding=json&l-format=Thesis

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

book
encoding

format of results

json
l-format

format or type of work

Thesis

see the Trove help documentation for a list of formats

This parameter can be used multiple times, however, this will behave like an AND query and only those articles in all of the specified formats will be returned.

Exclude works with a particular format

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather NOT format:Book &zone=picture&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather NOT format:Book

by adding NOT format:Book to the query we should filter out books

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

picture
encoding

format of results

json

You can use the format index in both the query and as a facet, that means you can say that you don't want works with particular formats. This is handy for filtering out noise.

Limit to works created within a particular date range

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather date:[* TO 1900]&zone=book&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather date:[* TO 1900]

using the date index you can specify a range of years; use '*' to indicate the earliest or latest possible dates, this example will return all works published in 1900 or before

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

book
encoding

format of results

json

Limit to works with a thumbnail image

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather imageInd:thumbnail &zone=picture&encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather imageInd:thumbnail

set imageInd to 'thumbnail' to limit results to works that include a thumbnail link

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

picture
encoding

format of results

json

The actual thumbnail link is included in the identifier field with a linktype of 'thumbnail'. To ensure you get all the possible values for identifier you can also add &include=links to your query.

Include metadata from all versions of a work

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=wragge&zone=picture&encoding=json&include=workversions

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

wragge
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

picture
encoding

format of results

json
include

format of results

workversions

include the metadata for each individual version of this work

The way that versions are grouped as works in Trove can be quite confusing. The work level metadata is generally quite consistent, but it can leave out useful metadata that's attached to an individual version. The version metadata is richer, but is also less consistent, so you have to be prepared for some trial and error if you want to extract information from it.

Find works with full text

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather fullTextInd:y&zone=article&encoding=json&include=workversions

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather fullTextInd:y

set fullTextInd to 'y' to return only articles with full text

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

article
encoding

format of results

json
include workversions

the full text is buried down in the version-level metadata, so you need to add this parameter if you want to actually get to it

The fullTextInd index seems quite misleading as it includes articles from commercial databases where only a truncated sample of the full text is actually available, and electronic legal deposit works where access to the text is restricted. It would seem better to combine this indicator with a search for "nla.obj" or nuc:ANL:DL to try and limit to resources digitised by the NLA and partners.

Limit to articles from a specific digitised journal (using facets)

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather&zone=article&encoding=json&l-title=The bulletin

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

article
encoding

format of results

json
l-title

limit to this journal title

The bulletin

There's no controlled list of journal titles to use with this facet, so you probably need to get the values from the web interface.

Limit to articles from a specific digitised journal (using identifiers)

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=weather "https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-68375465"&zone=article&encoding=json&l-format=Article

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

weather "https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-68375465"
zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

article
encoding

format of results

json
l-format

limit to this format

Article

limit the results to articles so we don't get the records for the periodicals themselves

An alternative to using the title facet is to include the identifier of the parent journal in the q parameter. This is how the Trove Digitised Journals app works.

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/result?q=rights:Free&zone=picture&encoding=json&include=workversions

parameter parameter note value value note
q

the search query (required)

rights:Free

see the Trove help documentation for a full list of possible values for rights

zone

zone(s) to search in (required)

picture
encoding

format of results

json
l-format

format of work

Photo
include workversions

the rights statements are attached to versions, so to see them you need to ask for the full versions data

This facet only works with records where the copyright status is specified in the record. Some out-of-copyright photographs might be missing from results because their status has not been identified. A search for photos created before 1955 using date[* TO 1954] might find additional out-of-copyright images.

Get individual records

Article or work identifiers are supplied as part of the url rather than as a query parameter. For example, https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/41697877 returns the details of the article with the identifier 41697877.

Get a newspaper or gazette article

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/41697877?encoding=json&reclevel=full&include=articletext,tags,comments

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
reclevel

amount of detail in record

full
include

include extra information

articletext,tags,comments

include the OCRd text, as well as any tags or comments, in the record

Get a work record

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/work/1144040?encoding=json&reclevel=full&include=workversions,tags,comments

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
reclevel

amount of detail in record

full
include

include extra information

workversions,tags,comments

include metadata from all grouped versions, as well as any tags or comments

Get a list

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/list/43805?encoding=json&reclevel=full&include=listitems

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
reclevel

amount of detail in record

full
include

include extra information

listitems

include details of all items in the list

You only get the brief record version for each of the list items, so to get extra information, such as OCRd text for a newspaper article, you'll have to request each article individually. Also, the list items are not paginated, so if you have a long list this will return a lot of data.

Get newspaper and gazette titles

There's a bug in the API so that a request for newspaper titles also returns the gazette titles. See the GLAM Workbench for a workaround.

Get a list of all newspaper titles

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/titles?encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json

Get a list of all gazette titles

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/gazette/titles?encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json

Get a list of newspapers from a particular state

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/titles?encoding=json&state=vic

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
state

limit to this state

vic

possible values are 'nsw', 'act', 'qld', 'tas', 'sa', 'nt', 'wa', 'vic', 'national'

Get the number of issues per year for a particular newspaper

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/title/35?encoding=json&include=years

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
include years

list the years available on Trove, with the number of issues per year

The newspaper identifier is included in the url as indicated. This example will return details of the Sydney Morning Herald which has an identifier of '35'.

Get details of newspaper issues within a date range

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/newspaper/title/35?encoding=json&include=years&range=18420101-18421231

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
include years

this needs to be included to retrieve the full issue information

range

date range of issues to return

18420101-18421231

dates are in YYYYMMDD format; this example will return details of all issues of the Sydney Morning Herald published in 1842

The issue details include a publication date and a url which redirects to the first page of the issue.

Get Trove contributors

Organisations can be nested under other organisations (as children), this makes the data structure a bit complex.

Get a list of organisations contributing data to Trove

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/contributor?encoding=json

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json

Get full details of an organisation contributing to Trove

https://api.trove.nla.gov.au/v2/contributor/ANL?encoding=json&reclevel=full

parameter parameter note value value note
encoding

format of results

json
reclevel

amount of detail to return

full

The organisation's identifier is included in the url as indicated. This example retrieves details for the National Library of Australia, whose identifier is 'ANL'.